What You Need To Know About RV Insurance

RV InsuranceFamily time together, the open road, and visiting beautiful scenery. Those are just some of the benefits of having an RV or Travel Trailer. Whether you’re a weekend warrior or a full time travel buff, there’s lots to see on the open road. Your RV is your home away from home. That’s why you need to make sure it is protected. Just like you purchase Auto or Homeowners Insurance, you need RV Insurance to cover this investment. 

What is RV Insurance?

Travel trailer or RV Insurance has similar coverage to auto insurance, however it is more comprehensive and specialized for RV owners. RV Insurance is designed for the following vehicles:

  • Fifth-wheels
  • Pop-up campers
  • Stationary travel trailers
  • Park model travel trailers
  • Truck-mounted campers

Click here to read about auto insurance.

Types of Coverage Available:

A typical policy will include the following overages:

  • Comprehensive/Collision Coverage. Protects your RV from damages, such as fire, landslide, windstorm, vandalism and collision with another vehicle or objects. 
  • Liability-Only Travel Trailer Policy. Protects against accidental damage to other people’s property or personal injury to individuals not listed on your policy. 

Additional Endorsements:

Because RV Insurance is specialized coverage there are additional endorsements you can purchase. These endorsements let you add extra protection not included in a standard policy. These additional option include:

  • Emergency Expenses: Protection in case of a breakdown or damage to your RV or Travel Trailer.
  • Accessories Endorsements: For items attached to your trailer.
  • Full-timer Trailer Coverage: For those who live in their travel trailer most of the year.
  • Campsite/Vacation Liability: Coverage while your travel trailer is parked in an RV park. 
  • Low Branch Collision: Protection against damages from low-hanging branches to your trailer, awnings, and air conditioning units. 
  • Towing and Roadside Assistance
  • Total Loss Replacement

What Are The Benefits Of A RV Insurance Policy?

RV Insurance is specialized coverage different than auto insurance. When traveling in your RV, you will have additional items with you that you may not normally carry in your car. Jewelry, a computer, television, and camping gear are just a few examples. When you’re at a campsite, you are liable for other people’s safety around your trailer. Also, if you have an accident while traveling, you will need a place to stay  while the trailer is being repaired. Without an RV Insurance policy, none of these would be covered in the event of a loss. The biggest benefit is the peace of mind you receive. 

If you love the open road and seeking adventure, contact us today to get covered today. 

 

 

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What You Need To Know About Boat Insurance When You Buy A Boat

Boat Insurance








Boat InsuranceIf your new boat is a canoe or an un-motorized boat, there’s a chance that it’s covered under the personal property portion of your Homeowners Insurance policy. However if it is anything larger, you need a separate boat insurance policy. A Bout Insurance policy is there to ensure you and your boat are protected. After all, I’m sure you purchased your boat with long term plans in mind.

Does My Homeowners Insurance Cover My Boat? 

Theft to watercraft, including furnishings, equipment and outboard motors, is typically excluded if the theft occurs outside your residential premises. To cover your boat and its accessories, you need a separate boat insurance policy.

What is Boat Insurance? 

A typical boat insurance policy will protect your boat, motor, equipment and passengers. Coverages will usually include:

  • Theft, loss or damage to the boat and attached equipment
  • Bodily injury coverage, if someone else is injured
  • Damage caused to someone else’s property by your boat or watercraft
  • Liability coverage for your passengers, which would include family and guests
  • Medical payment coverage for injuries to the occupants of the boat

Physical Damage Coverage

Physical damage coverage insures your boat, motor, boat trailer, boating equipment and other personal property against accidental loss or damages. 

Liability Coverage

A Boat Insurance policy will include two principal liability coverages.

  •  Personal liability coverage provides protection for legal liability. It pays up to the limit of your policy, the legal obligations imposed upon you due to an accident resulting from the ownership, maintenance or use of your watercraft, including bodily injury, property damage and legal defense. 
  • Medical payments coverage pays medical expenses up to the limits in the policy, including the insured’s boating-related medical expenses from an accident arising out of the ownership, maintenance and use of the boat. Expenses include hospital, medical and ambulance. 

Additional Coverage Options

Along with the basics some extra coverage to consider include:

  • Reasonable Repairs. Covers repairs done to protect covered property from further damage
  • Emergency Services. Pays for reasonalbe costs that you incur 4resulting from specified emergency service to your boat, motor or boat trailer. 
  • Wreck Removal. Pays the reasonable expenses you incur for any attempted or actual raising, removal or destruction for the wreck of your watercraft when damage is caused by an insured loss and remove or destruction required by law. 
  • Umbrella Liability. Provides additional boat insurance coverage across the board for home, auto and watercraft. 

Whether your boat is big or small, it’s still an investment. As a result, we want to make sure your are protected and familiar with your coverage. Call us at 419-522-9892 to review your policy or get a quote today.








Fire Safety and Prevention, What You Need To Know

fire safety and prevention








fire safety and preventionHome is where the heart is…it’s also where your family, prized possessions and most fond memories are. Home is also the same place that has the greatest risk of fire. Nearly 80% of fire deaths in the US each year occur in the home. Are you taking steps to keep your home and family safe? We have some tips for fire safety and prevention to share with you. 

Fire Safety

  • Check all electrical appliances, cords and outlets. makes sure they are all in working condition, without loose or frayed cords or plugs.
  • Use caution with portable heaters. Never place one where a child or pet could accidentally knock it over, and keep it at least 3 feet away from flammable objects.
  • Be careful in the kitchen. Cooking is the leading cause of home fires. Always practice safe cooking habits, such as turning pot handles to avoid being knocked over, and supervising children while cooking.
  • Check the fireplace. It should be kept clean and covered with a screen to keep sparks contained. Burn only wood in a home fireplace and never leave a fire burning unattended.
  • Beware of cigarettes. They are the number one cause of fire deaths in the US. Most are started when ashes or butts fall into couches or chairs, so use caution if you smoke in your home.
  • Use candles safely. Keep them out of the reach of children, away from curtains and furniture, and extinguish them before you leave the room. Do not allow children to use candles when unsupervised by an adult.
  • Be aware of holiday dangers. If you use a cut Christmas tree, be sure to keep it watered daily, and inspect all lights yearly for worn or frayed cords.

Fire Prevention

  • Install smoke alarms on every level of your home.
  • Use the smoke alarm’s test button to check it every month and replace the batteries at least once a year.
  • Replace smoke alarms every 10 years.
  • Plan escape routes by determining at least two ways to escape from every room.
  • Caution everyone to stay low to the floor while escaping and never open doors that are hot.
  • Select a safe location outside your home where everyone should meet, and practice your escape plan at least twice a year so everyone knows it well.

Do you need to discuss homeowners insurance with one of our agents? Click here to learn more or Click here to contact us.

Share these fire safety and prevention tips with everyone you care about, you can never be too careful!
Your friends at Rinehart-Walters-Danner Insurance.








Antique and Classic Car Insurance; What Makes It Different?

antique and classic car insurance








Antique and classic cars are visibly different than the cars we drive today. You use them differently than your day to day car, so why treat them the same when it comes to insuring them? Antique and classic car insurance is specifically designed with your vehicle in mind.

antique and classic car insurance

The Basics

When insuring your antique or classic car, consider how you will be using the vehicle.

  • Will you only drive the vehicle to car shows or in a few parades? If so, your policy should be limited to those circumstances.
  • Are you going to use your antique vehicle to go to the grocery store, hit the beach or visit a relative? Then your policy should reflect this kind of use.

A typical classic car insurance policy includes the following:

  • Agreed value coverage: Pays for the car’s full-insured value with no depreciation in the event of a total loss, less your deductible.
  • Inflation guard: To compensate for inflation and appreciation, the policy increases the vehicle’s value quarterly.
  • Spare parts coverage
  • Flexible usage: Limits on mileage ranging from 2,500 o 5,000 miles annually. Not limited to parades.

Additional Coverage Options

You can also purchase the following additional coverage’s for you antique and classic car insurance:

  • Emergency towing in case of breakdown
  • Roadside assistance
  • Emergency lockout
  • Emergency travel expenses in case your vehicle breaks down while away from hoe
  • Theft reward
  • Car show expenses: This policy will pay for expenses associated with missing a car show due to a breakdown
  • Personal effects: This policy will reimburse you for items that are vandalized or stolen when reported to police

Your Needs Are Unique

Since antique and classic cars are all so different, your insurance coverage will be specific to your vehicle. There are many considerations that you and your agent will discuss while creating a policy to suit your classic car. Contact us to day to build your personalized antique and classic car insurance policy.

Click here to learn more about auto insurance.

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Should I Bundle My Insurance Policies Or Not?

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bundleIf you’ve ever shopped around for insurance, you’ve likely been asked if you want to bundle your policies. In other words, combine your home or renters, auto and life insurance policies with the same carrier. Although you have the option to shop around individually for each policy, it almost always makes sense to have the same carrier cover as many of your policies as possible.

Click here to learn more about personal insurance options

Benefits of Bundling

  • The discount—Most policyholders bundle their policies because of the promise of a discount. The amount varies by provider but can generally range between 5-25 percent.
  • The option of a single deductible—With bundled policies, your deductible may be cheaper in the event of a claim that affects multiple policies. For example, if your home and auto policies are with two separate carriers, and a hailstorm damages your home and your car, you’re responsible for paying both your home and auto deductibles before receiving payment. But if you bundle your policies, your provider may offer you the option to pay only the higher of the two deductibles.
  • Less chance of being dropped—If you’ve made claims or gotten tickets, having your policies bundled with one provider can decrease the chance of them dropping you.

When It Doesn’t Pay to Bundle

It isn’t always better to bundle your policies with one insurance carrier. Here’s when it may be better to split them up:

  • If you have tickets or past claims that make your auto insurance expensive – In this case, it may be cheaper overall to buy each policy from separate providers.
  • When premiums increase—Bundling discourages people from price shopping, which makes it easier for providers to increase their rates. Most assume that you won’t go through the effort of shopping around when your policies renew.
  • If policies aren’t technically bundled—Some carriers may insure you with an affiliated company. Although you may get a discount with that company, you’ll lose the convenience of paying your premium with one familiar provider.

A Few Tips to Consider

Although discounts are the main reason people bundle their insurance policies, never assume that bundling is the cheapest option. Your needs and circumstances will dictate whether you should combine your policies with one carrier. Consider the following tips:

  • Shop for new coverage when your policies renew. Ask for the price of the individual premiums as well as the price of the bundled premium. Then you can decide whether it is worth it. Just make sure you compare the same coverage when shopping for quotes from each carrier.
  • Ask if the provider uses a third-party insurance company. Remember that you may save money but lose the convenience of dealing with one provider and a combined bill.
  • Ask an independent insurance agent to get prices from multiple companies so you don’t have to do the legwork. An agent that is loyal to a particular carrier may be able to offer discounts that you can’t get alone.

With multiple factors contributing to the price of your insurance premiums, it is important to shop around in order to get the best rate for your insurance needs. Feel free to contact us to determine if bundling is right for you and help you take advantage of all available discounts.








Do You Understand The Benefits Offered By Your Job?

Benefits Offered By Your Job








Benefits Offered By Your JobMany employers recognize the hard work their employees do every day. In addition to a pay check, many employers will offer additional benefits to compensate their employees. Whether you are a new employee of the company, or an existing employee that has never enrolled in the benefits, understanding everything an employer has to offer can be difficult. We break this all down and help you understand the benefits offered by your job.

Common Benefits Offered By Employers

When it comes to benefits offered by employers, there is no set guideline to use. As a result, employers build their own benefits packages and can pick and choose what they want to offer. Some of the most common options include:

  • Medical Insurance
  • Dental Insurance
  • Vision Insurance
  • Disability Insurance
  • Life Insurance
  • Flexible Spending Account (FSA)
  • Health Savings Account (HSA)

Click here to learn more about employee benefits.

Employer-paid vs Voluntary benefits

Depending on the size of the company you work for, there may be several packages available. Some may be employer-paid, some may be voluntary and some may be in the middle where you and the employer split the cost. There could be several options for benefits offered by your job.

  • Employer-paid benefits are those that the employer pays 100% of the cost. This typically includes life insurance and disability insurance.
  • Voluntary benefits are those you the employee can choose to elect or not. You will pay 100% of the premium. This typically includes dental and vision insurance
  • Contributory benefits are those that you and the employer both pay for. The employer picks how much they will pay and then you pay the remainder. One example would be medical insurance. The employer may pay 80% of the premium, you pay the remaining 20%

What Coverages Are Included In The Benefits Offered By Employers?

This will vary for each company. They will be able to provide you with a summary of benefits that will show you basic plan information. Deductibles, copay’s, coinsurance and maximum out of pocket is standard on each summary. Employers have HR departments or an insurance agent they work with. They will be able to explain everything to you and help you enroll.

Understanding benefits offered by employers can be overwhelming. Take time to review the information provided to you and don’t be afraid to ask questions. Every individual’s situation is different however employers have specific plans in place to help you.

Have questions? Contact us today, we can help.








Helping You Avoid A Collision: Beware of Animals on the Road

animals on the road








According to recent estimates from the Federal Highway Administration, there are over 300,000 wildlife-vehicle collisions in the United States every year. Even more concerning, nearly 2,000 of these indicents are deadly for the driver. These statisitics underscore why it’s important to take the proper precautions to avoid a collision with an animal. Whether you’re driving in the city or the country, here are some tips to keep you safe behind the wheel and prepared in the event that there are animals on the road.

Beware of Animals on the Road

  • Remain alert at all times and watch out for animals.
  • Slow down if you see an animal up ahead, as it is generally unpredictable.
  • Slow down at designated animal crossing areas marked by road signs. These signs indicate that the area has a lot of animal traffic and an increased potential for accidents.
  • Use your high beams at night to see animals easier.
  • Watch your speed, especially during dusk and at night.
  • Have your vehicle’s brakes and tires checked regularly to ensure they are in safe working order.
  • Watch out for movement and shiny eyes on the roadsides. Slow down if you see anything suspicious. In addition, slow down on blind curve areas of the road.
  • If you see an animal in front of you, do not swerve because it may cause you to hit another vehicle, side rail or lose control all together. Use your brakes immediately.
  • Always wear a seat belt—it’s your best safety defense.
  • Animal and vehicle collisions are especially commonplace between October and December. Make sure you are especially diligent as you drive during this time.

If a Collision Occurs

In the event that your vehicle collides with an animal, pull off to the side of the road and call the state patrol or local police department. Do not attempt to move the animal if it is lying in the middle of the road. Never leave your vehicle to check on an injured animal, as it may still be alive and potentially dangerous to you. Stay in your vehicle until help arrives.

For additional driving safety guidance and auto insurance solutions, contact us today.








How To Determine The Amount Of Life Insurance You Need








Life insurance is not a fun topic to think or talk about. However, it is a necessary one. Do you have loved ones that depend on you financially? Do you have college loans or a mortgage that you do not want you family members to have to take over? Life insurance is about protecting those you love in the event that something happens to you. Your designated beneficiary would collect a financial benefit upon your death. 

 

Life insurance can be confusing, but that’s where we come in. There are numerous types of insurance. Term, Whole Life, Universal Life. Not all plans may be the best fit for your needs. When looking at life insurance you want to make sure to get the best rate but also the best fit for your family’s needs. 

Click here to learn more about the types of life insurance. 

Once you determine that you need it and what type you want, how to you determine the amount of life insurance you need?  

How Much To Buy?

A few common factors to keep in mind when determining the amount of life insurance you need are:

  • What debts do you have?
  • What is your income?
  • Do you want to pay for a child or children’s college education?
  • What expenses will continue even after you are gone? 

Many people decide based on an income replacement calculation, between 5 and 10 times the amount of your current income. Think about your personal circumstances. Is your income the sole income for your household? Are there other expenses, such as college tuition, that may arise in the future? Don’t forget to include potential medical and funeral costs. One goal of life insurance is to ensure your family does not get stuck with bills, debts or expenses that they cannot afford. 

Click here for a life insurance calculator. 

If you have people that depend on you for financial support, it’s important to make an educated decision about life insurance options. Contact your agent today to discuss life insurance and your family’s needs. 

 

 








Common Auto Insurance Terms You Need To Know And Understand

auto insurance terms








Auto insurance can be confusing at times. Policies often contain a variety of auto insurance terms that can be difficult to understand, especially for someone without a background in insurance.

The following is a list of common auto insurance terms to keep in mind the next time you meet with your insurance broker:

  • Accident report form: Sometimes referred to as a police report, this form contains important information about an auto accident, such as circumstances that led to an accident, the parties involved and details regarding the citations given.
  • At fault: This term refers to the degree to which a party caused or contributed to an accident. This term is often used to determine whose auto insurance company pays for specific portions of damages incurred as the result of an accident.
  • Automobile liability insurance: This refers to a type of insurance that provides coverage when a party causes an accident and either physical or property damage occurs.
  • Bodily injury liability coverage: This type of insurance provides coverage for injuries or deaths to people involved in the accident other than the insured driver. This coverage kicks in if an insured person is legally liable for an accident and also provides coverage for defense costs if the insured is sued.
  • Claims adjuster: A claims adjuster is a representative from an insurance company who investigates and settles claims. This person’s job is to ensure that all parties involved in an accident receive fair compensation.
  • Collision coverage: A form of auto insurance that provides for reimbursement for loss to a covered vehicle due to its colliding with another vehicle, object or the overturn of the automobile.
  • Comprehensive coverage: This coverage pays for any repairs not directly related to a collision. This includes damages from fires, thefts, windstorms, floods and vandalism.
  • Covered loss: A covered loss is any damage to yourself, your vehicle, other people or property covered by your insurance policy.
  • Declarations page: Sometimes referred to as an auto insurance coverage summary, this is a document provided by an insurance company. These documents list the following for policyholders:
    o The types of coverage elected
    o Specific limits for each coverage
    o The cost of each coverage
    o Specific vehicles covered by the policy
    o Types of coverage for each vehicle covered by the policy
  • Deductible: A deductible is the portion of a covered loss that a policyholder agrees to pay out of pocket.
  • Endorsement: Any change, addition or optional coverage added to an insurance policy. An endorsement may require additional premium.
  • Garaging location: A garaging location refers to the primary location you park your car when it’s not in use.
  • Limits: Limits refer to the maximum dollar amount of protection purchased by the policyholder for specific coverages. State laws often require drivers to have a minimum level of coverage.
  • Loss: Refers to direct and accidental damages to a person or property.
  • Medical payments coverage: Coverage that pays for reasonable medical expenses and death benefits to a policyholder and any passengers injured in the event of an auto accident, regardless of fault.
  • Motor vehicle report (MVR): MVRs are official records held by states that detail a driver’s licensing status, violations, suspensions and other infractions incurred over the last several years. These forms are often used to determine premiums.
  • Named insured: The primary person the insurance policy is issued to.
  • No-fault automobile insurance: This type of coverage is used to compensate victims of accidents without having to prove who caused the accident.
  • Non-owners policy: This policy provides liability and add-on coverage for someone who does not own a vehicle.
  • Personal injury protection coverage: Sometimes referred to as PIP, this coverage pays for medical expenses, and, in some states, lost wages and other damages, if a person is injured in an auto accident, regardless of who is at fault. This coverage often covers pedestrians struck by vehicles as well.
  • Premium: A premium is the amount a policyholder pays to an insurance company for coverage.
  • Primary use: Primary use refers to how a policyholder mainly uses his or her vehicle. Primary use options often include work, business, pleasure or farm use.
  • Principal driver: The principal driver is the person who drives the insured vehicle the most.
  • Property damage liability coverage (PD): If an insured person is legally liable for an accident, PD coverage pays for damage to others’ property resulting from the accident. PD also pays for legal defense costs if you are sued.
  • Rental reimbursement coverage: This coverage reimburses you (up to a set daily amount) for a rental car if your car is being repaired due to damage covered by your auto insurance policy.
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage (UM): This coverage helps pay for medical bills, pain and suffering related to bodily injuries caused by a driver who is uninsured or underinsured.
  • Vehicle identification number (VIN): This is a unique 17-character sequence containing both letters and numbers that identifies a vehicle.

If you need clarification on any auto insurance terms or conditions when meeting with your insurance broker, don’t hesitate to ask. Doing so ensures that you fully understand your policy and get the coverage you need.

To discuss your auto insurance needs, contact Rinehart, Walters & Danner Insurance Agency today








Do I Have To Pay If A Tree Falls On My House?

tree falls








tree fallsEvery year, storms are responsible for knocking over or breaking off limbs of numerous trees. Unfortunately, sometimes, a limb or tree falls on our house or other property. Cleaning up the damage from a storm can be a difficult task, both physically and emotionally. And things can become especially tense when you discover that it’s your neighbor’s tree that damaged your house.

To make matters worse, many homeowners are surprised to discover that if a neighbor’s tree falls on their house, it’s usually their own homeowners policy—not their neighbor’s—that will cover the cost of the damages. What follows are general guidelines for who pays what in various situations. However, you should also check your homeowners policy for coverages and exclusions. (Click here to learn more about homeowners insurance policies)

Your Property, Your Policy

Generally speaking, if your property is damaged, you are responsible for the damages. It doesn’t matter if the tree or limb came from your property, your neighbor’s property or even municipal property. Keep in mind that a windstorm isn’t anyone’s fault; it’s an act of nature. If a tree does damage your property during a windstorm, your policy will cover the damages. After all, that’s why you purchased a homeowners policy. To protect yourself against unforeseen losses like a tree damaging your house.

Their Property, Their Policy

It might seem unfair that if it’s your neighbor’s tree that damages your home, you should have to pay. Fortunately for you, that standard applies both ways. If a storm rolls through and your tree falls and damages your neighbor’s house, his or her insurance is going to cover the damages.

Negligence and Liability

So far, these scenarios have been fairly straightforward. But what happens when it wasn’t a storm that made the tree fall? Instead, your neighbor’s tree was hollowed out from years of disease, and he’d neglected to do anything about it. In fact, it was so diseased that you expressed your concern to your neighbor that it might topple over and damage your property. Unfortunately, one day, that’s exactly what happens. What then?

Your insurance carrier is still going to be the one paying your claim. However, if you can prove your neighbor knew that the tree was diseased and that he or she neglected to fix it your insurance carrier would probably attempt to collect from your neighbor’s insurance. If your carrier is successful, you could be reimbursed for your deductible.

Remember, though, this rule also applies the other way. If you have diseased or damaged trees on your property and they damage your neighbor’s house, he or she can try to prove your negligence. Your property is your responsibility. So it’s best to inspect your trees every year for signs of disease or damage. If you’re not sure what you’re looking for, consider having a professional arborist examine your trees.

Other Structures

If the tree doesn’t damage your house but instead damages your fence, are you still covered? Generally, you are. Most homeowners policies distinguish between two different kinds of structures on your property. The “dwelling” refers to your house and any attached structures (like an attached garage), as well as any fixtures attached to the house. “Other structures,” including detached garages, sheds, fences or gazebos, are also insured, but typically only for 10 percent of the coverage on your dwelling.

Vehicles

If, in the aftermath of a storm, you discover that a tree has fallen on your car, your homeowners policy doesn’t apply. Instead, you’ll be looking at your auto policy. If you have comprehensive coverage on your vehicle, your auto insurance carrier will pay for the damages, after you pay your deductible. The same rule would apply to a guest’s car. Hopefully, he or she took out comprehensive coverage, too.(Click here to learn about auto insurance)

Removal and Cleanup

What if the tree fell but didn’t hit anything? Would you be covered for removal costs? If the fallen tree blocks a path to your front door or driveway, then many homeowners policies would pay for removal. Generally, the maximum coverage is around $500. If the tree simply falls in the middle of your yard, your policy likely wouldn’t cover it. Unless the fallen tree damaged insured property, there is no loss to file a claim for.

Replacement

Replacing the trees themselves can be more complicated. Trees that have fallen due to wind damage may or may not be covered, so it’s best to check with your broker. Most policies offer limited coverage for trees that have fallen due to fire, lightning, explosion, theft, vandalism, malicious mischief or aircraft. Amounts and exclusions will vary. It’s important to read your policy and check with your broker if you have any questions.

Making Sure You’re Covered

Hopefully, your trees grow and endure. In the event that they fall, it’s important to know that you’re covered. Contact our office today to make sure that you have sufficient coverage for whatever might blow your way.