What You Need To Know About Boat Insurance When You Buy A Boat

Boat Insurance

Boat InsuranceIf your new boat is a canoe or an un-motorized boat, there’s a chance that it’s covered under the personal property portion of your Homeowners Insurance policy. However if it is anything larger, you need a separate boat insurance policy. A Bout Insurance policy is there to ensure you and your boat are protected. After all, I’m sure you purchased your boat with long term plans in mind.

Does My Homeowners Insurance Cover My Boat? 

Theft to watercraft, including furnishings, equipment and outboard motors, is typically excluded if the theft occurs outside your residential premises. To cover your boat and its accessories, you need a separate boat insurance policy.

What is Boat Insurance? 

A typical boat insurance policy will protect your boat, motor, equipment and passengers. Coverages will usually include:

  • Theft, loss or damage to the boat and attached equipment
  • Bodily injury coverage, if someone else is injured
  • Damage caused to someone else’s property by your boat or watercraft
  • Liability coverage for your passengers, which would include family and guests
  • Medical payment coverage for injuries to the occupants of the boat

Physical Damage Coverage

Physical damage coverage insures your boat, motor, boat trailer, boating equipment and other personal property against accidental loss or damages. 

Liability Coverage

A Boat Insurance policy will include two principal liability coverages.

  •  Personal liability coverage provides protection for legal liability. It pays up to the limit of your policy, the legal obligations imposed upon you due to an accident resulting from the ownership, maintenance or use of your watercraft, including bodily injury, property damage and legal defense. 
  • Medical payments coverage pays medical expenses up to the limits in the policy, including the insured’s boating-related medical expenses from an accident arising out of the ownership, maintenance and use of the boat. Expenses include hospital, medical and ambulance. 

Additional Coverage Options

Along with the basics some extra coverage to consider include:

  • Reasonable Repairs. Covers repairs done to protect covered property from further damage
  • Emergency Services. Pays for reasonable costs that you incur 4resulting from specified emergency service to your boat, motor or boat trailer. 
  • Wreck Removal. Pays the reasonable expenses you incur for any attempted or actual raising, removal or destruction for the wreck of your watercraft when damage is caused by an insured loss and remove or destruction required by law. 
  • Umbrella Liability. Provides additional boat insurance coverage across the board for home, auto and watercraft. 

Whether your boat is big or small, it’s still an investment. As a result, we want to make sure your are protected and familiar with your coverage. Call us at 419-522-9892 to review your policy or get a quote today.

Should I Bundle All My Insurance Policies Or Not?

bundle

bundleIf you’ve ever shopped around for insurance, you’ve likely been asked if you want to bundle your policies. In other words, combine your home or renters, auto and life insurance policies with the same carrier. Although you have the option to shop around individually for each policy, it almost always makes sense to have the same carrier cover as many of your policies as possible.

Click here to learn more about personal insurance options

Benefits of Bundling

  • The discount—Most policyholders bundle their policies because of the promise of a discount. The amount varies by provider but can generally range between 5-25 percent.
  • The option of a single deductible—With bundled policies, your deductible may be cheaper in the event of a claim that affects multiple policies. For example, if your home and auto policies are with two separate carriers, and a hailstorm damages your home and your car, you’re responsible for paying both your home and auto deductibles before receiving payment. But if you bundle your policies, your provider may offer you the option to pay only the higher of the two deductibles.
  • Less chance of being dropped—If you’ve made claims or gotten tickets, having your policies bundled with one provider can decrease the chance of them dropping you.

When It Doesn’t Pay to Bundle

It isn’t always better to bundle your policies with one insurance carrier. Here’s when it may be better to split them up:

  • If you have tickets or past claims that make your auto insurance expensive – In this case, it may be cheaper overall to buy each policy from separate providers.
  • When premiums increase—Bundling discourages people from price shopping, which makes it easier for providers to increase their rates. Most assume that you won’t go through the effort of shopping around when your policies renew.
  • If policies aren’t technically bundled—Some carriers may insure you with an affiliated company. Although you may get a discount with that company, you’ll lose the convenience of paying your premium with one familiar provider.

A Few Tips to Consider

Although discounts are the main reason people bundle their insurance policies, never assume that bundling is the cheapest option. Your needs and circumstances will dictate whether you should combine your policies with one carrier. Consider the following tips:

  • Shop for new coverage when your policies renew. Ask for the price of the individual premiums as well as the price of the bundled premium. Then you can decide whether it is worth it. Just make sure you compare the same coverage when shopping for quotes from each carrier.
  • Ask if the provider uses a third-party insurance company. Remember that you may save money but lose the convenience of dealing with one provider and a combined bill.
  • Ask an independent insurance agent to get prices from multiple companies so you don’t have to do the legwork. An agent that is loyal to a particular carrier may be able to offer discounts that you can’t get alone.

With multiple factors contributing to the price of your insurance premiums, it is important to shop around in order to get the best rate for your insurance needs. Feel free to contact us to determine if bundling is right for you and help you take advantage of all available discounts.

Helping You Understand the Different Parts of a Homeowners Insurance Policy

Homeowners Insurance Policy

Homeowners insurance is one of the most frequently purchased forms of coverage among U.S. residents. As their name suggests, these policies provide critical financial protection for your home, family and belongings. However, homeowners insurance coverage can also be a complicated subject. Although these policies may be common, they can vary significantly in their details and capabilities. As such, it’s critical to conduct your due diligence and ensure you thoroughly understand your homeowners insurance policy and the coverage it provides.

Different Types of Homeowners Insurance Policies

There are many types of homeowners insurance policies for you to choose from. The form you select plays a significant role in determining the financial assistance available to you following losses. Some policies may only provide coverage for the physical structure of your home, while others may provide more extensive coverage. Similarly, some types of homeowners insurance can render financial assistance in response to a wider variety of perils than others. This article focuses primarily on HO-3 homeowners insurance policies.

An Overview of HO-3 Homeowners Insurance

According to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, HO-3 homeowners insurance policies are the most common type of homeowners coverage. This form of insurance casts a wide safety net across many risks and exposures that may affect your home while also providing coverage for many aspects of your life. Generally, HO-3 policies are composed of the following primary components:

  • Dwelling coverage—Your HO-3 homeowners insurance can provide financial assistance if the physical structure of your home is damaged or destroyed by a covered peril. This may include its roof, walls, floors, foundations and attached appliances.
  • Other structures coverage—This includes coverage for additional structures on your property other than your primary residence, such as detached garages, tool sheds, gazebos, guest houses and fences.
  • Contents coverage—This coverage can provide financial assistance for losses related to your personal belongings, including furniture, clothing and electronics.
  • Loss-of-use coverage—If a covered event damages your home or makes it uninhabitable temporarily, this part of your HO-3 insurance policy can help pay for resulting expenses, including dining at restaurants or staying in hotels. This coverage may also compensate you for lost income if you rent out part of your home but are unable to collect rent due to property damage.
  • Liability coverage—Your insurance can provide financial assistance if you or your family (including pets) are at fault for another party’s losses. This may include bodily injury and property damage costs, such as the affected party’s medical bills or lost wages. This coverage also provides financial assistance for legal expenses arising from such incidents.

Common Endorsements or Additional Coverages for HO-3 Homeowners Insurance

Although the core components of HO-3 homeowners coverages can provide ample financial protection in many situations, you should also work with a qualified insurance professional to identify any remaining coverage gaps. Certain perils and incidents may be excluded from standard HO-3 policies, meaning you would have to pay out of pocket for resulting losses.

Fortunately, you can augment your homeowners insurance with additional coverage by purchasing endorsements. These investments can prove invaluable, as they enhance your HO-3 policy to cover losses that might not otherwise qualify. Common endorsements to consider include the following:

  • Water/sewer backup coverage—If your plumbing or sewer line backs up and causes water damage, this endorsement can help recoup your losses.
  • Scheduled property coverage—Although the contents coverage generally included in standard HO-3 policies can protect some of your belongings, particularly valuable items, such as jewelry, art and collectibles, may require this endorsement to be fully covered.
  • Service line coverage—If your phone, power lines, sewer, gas lines or water pipes are damaged on your personal property, this endorsement can help cover the cost of repairs or replacements.
  • Flood coverage—Property damage from external water entering your home (i.e., due to flooding) is not generally covered under a standard policy. Check with your agent to determine if you can add flood coverage to your policy via a policy endorsement, which is the case in some areas of the country. However, most often, you’ll need to purchase a stand-alone flood insurance policy, which your agent should be able to assist you with.
  • Earthquake coverage—Losses caused by earthquakes are typically excluded from HO-3 policies. To ensure coverage for these perils, consider adding an endorsement to your homeowners insurance or acquiring a separate earthquake insurance policy.
  • Windstorm coverage—In many cases, such as if you live in areas prone to tornados and hurricanes, coverage for losses arising from severe windstorms may not be covered. As such, you may need to add a windstorm endorsement, if available where you live, or talk to your agent about purchasing a windstorm insurance policy to gain appropriate coverage.

Acquire Optimal Coverage

Without fully understanding your homeowners insurance policy, it’s impossible to ensure your coverage is adequate. With that in mind, working with a qualified insurance professional to assess your circumstances, explore your options and assemble ideal homeowners coverage is necessary. Contact Rinehart, Walters & Danner for more information.

Do You Understand The Benefits Offered By Your Job?

Benefits Offered By Your Job

Benefits Offered By Your JobMany employers recognize the hard work their employees do every day. In addition to a pay check, many employers will offer additional benefits to compensate their employees. Whether you are a new employee of the company, or an existing employee that has never enrolled in the benefits, understanding everything an employer has to offer can be difficult. We break this all down and help you understand the benefits offered by your job.

Common Benefits Offered By Employers

When it comes to benefits offered by employers, there is no set guideline to use. As a result, employers build their own benefits packages and can pick and choose what they want to offer. Some of the most common options include:

  • Medical Insurance
  • Dental Insurance
  • Vision Insurance
  • Disability Insurance
  • Life Insurance
  • Flexible Spending Account (FSA)
  • Health Savings Account (HSA)

Click here to learn more about employee benefits.

Employer-paid vs Voluntary benefits

Depending on the size of the company you work for, there may be several packages available. Some may be employer-paid, some may be voluntary and some may be in the middle where you and the employer split the cost. There could be several options for benefits offered by your job.

  • Employer-paid benefits are those that the employer pays 100% of the cost. This typically includes life insurance and disability insurance.
  • Voluntary benefits are those you the employee can choose to elect or not. You will pay 100% of the premium. This typically includes dental and vision insurance
  • Contributory benefits are those that you and the employer both pay for. The employer picks how much they will pay and then you pay the remainder. One example would be medical insurance. The employer may pay 80% of the premium, you pay the remaining 20%

What Coverages Are Included In The Benefits Offered By Employers?

This will vary for each company. They will be able to provide you with a summary of benefits that will show you basic plan information. Deductibles, copay’s, coinsurance and maximum out of pocket is standard on each summary. Employers have HR departments or an insurance agent they work with. They will be able to explain everything to you and help you enroll.

Understanding benefits offered by employers can be overwhelming. Take time to review the information provided to you and don’t be afraid to ask questions. Every individual’s situation is different however employers have specific plans in place to help you.

Have questions? Contact us today, we can help.

Important Insurance Tips For Your College Student

Insurance tips for your college student

Insurance tips for your college student

High School is over and it’s time for the next big step, college. The new students schedule is done, books are purchased and the day is approaching fast for the big move. New furniture, décor and electronics are all packed and ready to go. Before your college student can begin their next adventure you have one last item to complete on your check list. Talking with your insurance agent. While that may seem like an odd item to have on your checklist, it is probably one of the most important. Your insurance agent will have important insurance tips for your college student. When your child leaves home and takes up a new residence at college, that can affect how their belongings are covered. Below are a few questions you may have when it comes to insurance and your college student.

Will my college student’s belongings be covered by my homeowners policy?

Does your child lives in a campus dorm? There is usually a small amount of coverage that would be extended from your homeowners policy. If your child has expensive items, or a lot of items, you may need to consider purchasing additional coverage. Does your child lives in off campus housing? Their belongings may not be covered at all.

Is renters insurance really necessary?

Yes. Chances are your child’s belongings will exceed the amount provided by your homeowners policy, if they are even covered at all. Renters insurance will cover the possessions in your child’s housing at a small cost. You can purchase renters insurance for as little as $15 per month. This will not only give you the extra coverage, but peace of mind that that expensive new laptop or TV will be protected in the event of fire, theft, or other disaster.

In addition to your college students belongings, the move to college can affect your auto coverage and health coverage.

Will your child move more than 100 miles away from home?

If this answer is yes and they do not keep a vehicle at school, your insurance premiums could decrease by as much as 30%. If they are taking a car with them, be sure to review your auto coverage with your agent. Make sure you have the appropriate coverage and your child understands how it works in the event of a claim.

Does my child need to purchase health insurance?

In the state of Ohio, many health insurance carriers are now required to coverage children up to age 26. This rule applies regardless of full time student status. Be sure to review your health coverage to verify the dependent age limit on your plan. Also, make sure your child has an ID card with them if they should need to see a Dr or get a Prescription. They should also understand how the coverage works and if there is any copay they will be responsible for if they should have to use the coverage.

Sending a child to college can be a scary yet exciting time for everyone. When you add your insurance agent to your list of people to talk to during this transition, it can help give you peace of mind for you and your child’s future insurance needs. Remember, your agent is a great source for insurance tips for your college student.

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Important Information You Need To Know When Filing A Homeowners Insurance Claim

Homeowners insurance claim

Homeowners insurance claimDealing With a Homeowners Insurance Claim

If you’ve had a fire, water damage or another unfortunate event in your home, don’t fret. We have all the information that you need to get your claim underway so you can get your life back to normal.

When you have a homeowners insurance claim, your actions can make all the difference. Here’s how to maneuver through the claims process with ease:

  • If you were away from your home when the incident occurred, exercise caution when entering your property. If your property has sustained major damage, contact your local government officials to determine how you should proceed.
  • Report downed power lines to the utility company, and keep your electricity off if there is standing water in your home.
  • If it appears as though it is not safe to be at your home, leave.
  • Contact us to report how, when and where the damage occurred. Make a note of the claim handler’s name, telephone number and identification number when you call.
  • Protect your home from further damage without putting yourself in danger. This may include boarding up windows and salvaging possessions that did not sustain much damage. Your claim handler can advise you on how to do so safely
  • Prepare a list of damaged or lost items from your home.
  • Keep damaged items in your home until the claim handler has come for an inspection. Also, consider documenting the damage with pictures or video.
  • Provide receipts for damaged items if you saved them.
  • If you need to temporarily relocate, save all your receipts for additional expenses. Your policy may cover you for additional living expenses during this time.
  • Once you’ve reported your claim, the claim handler will send you some documents to complete within a specific period of time. Contact us if you have any questions, and return these forms promptly.
  • Contact your mortgage lender to notify them of your loss and to discuss potential contractor bids. Your lender may want to inspect a contractor’s job before making a final payment.

Let us help you throughout the process—contact us if you have questions or concerns. If you have not reviewed your homeowners insurance policy lately, please do so soon. It’s better to review your coverage before you need it. 

Click here to read more about homeowners insurance coverage. 

Do I Have To Pay If A Tree Falls On My House?

tree falls

tree fallsEvery year, storms are responsible for knocking over or breaking off limbs of numerous trees. Unfortunately, sometimes, a limb or tree falls on our house or other property. Cleaning up the damage from a storm can be a difficult task, both physically and emotionally. And things can become especially tense when you discover that it’s your neighbor’s tree that damaged your house.

To make matters worse, many homeowners are surprised to discover that if a neighbor’s tree falls on their house, it’s usually their own homeowners policy—not their neighbor’s—that will cover the cost of the damages. What follows are general guidelines for who pays what in various situations. However, you should also check your homeowners policy for coverages and exclusions. (Click here to learn more about homeowners insurance policies)

Your Property, Your Policy

Generally speaking, if your property is damaged, you are responsible for the damages. It doesn’t matter if the tree or limb came from your property, your neighbor’s property or even municipal property. Keep in mind that a windstorm isn’t anyone’s fault; it’s an act of nature. If a tree does damage your property during a windstorm, your policy will cover the damages. After all, that’s why you purchased a homeowners policy. To protect yourself against unforeseen losses like a tree damaging your house.

Their Property, Their Policy

It might seem unfair that if it’s your neighbor’s tree that damages your home, you should have to pay. Fortunately for you, that standard applies both ways. If a storm rolls through and your tree falls and damages your neighbor’s house, his or her insurance is going to cover the damages.

Negligence and Liability

So far, these scenarios have been fairly straightforward. But what happens when it wasn’t a storm that made the tree fall? Instead, your neighbor’s tree was hollowed out from years of disease, and he’d neglected to do anything about it. In fact, it was so diseased that you expressed your concern to your neighbor that it might topple over and damage your property. Unfortunately, one day, that’s exactly what happens. What then?

Your insurance carrier is still going to be the one paying your claim. However, if you can prove your neighbor knew that the tree was diseased and that he or she neglected to fix it your insurance carrier would probably attempt to collect from your neighbor’s insurance. If your carrier is successful, you could be reimbursed for your deductible.

Remember, though, this rule also applies the other way. If you have diseased or damaged trees on your property and they damage your neighbor’s house, he or she can try to prove your negligence. Your property is your responsibility. So it’s best to inspect your trees every year for signs of disease or damage. If you’re not sure what you’re looking for, consider having a professional arborist examine your trees.

Other Structures

If the tree doesn’t damage your house but instead damages your fence, are you still covered? Generally, you are. Most homeowners policies distinguish between two different kinds of structures on your property. The “dwelling” refers to your house and any attached structures (like an attached garage), as well as any fixtures attached to the house. “Other structures,” including detached garages, sheds, fences or gazebos, are also insured, but typically only for 10 percent of the coverage on your dwelling.

Vehicles

If, in the aftermath of a storm, you discover that a tree has fallen on your car, your homeowners policy doesn’t apply. Instead, you’ll be looking at your auto policy. If you have comprehensive coverage on your vehicle, your auto insurance carrier will pay for the damages, after you pay your deductible. The same rule would apply to a guest’s car. Hopefully, he or she took out comprehensive coverage, too.(Click here to learn about auto insurance)

Removal and Cleanup

What if the tree fell but didn’t hit anything? Would you be covered for removal costs? If the fallen tree blocks a path to your front door or driveway, then many homeowners policies would pay for removal. Generally, the maximum coverage is around $500. If the tree simply falls in the middle of your yard, your policy likely wouldn’t cover it. Unless the fallen tree damaged insured property, there is no loss to file a claim for.

Replacement

Replacing the trees themselves can be more complicated. Trees that have fallen due to wind damage may or may not be covered, so it’s best to check with your broker. Most policies offer limited coverage for trees that have fallen due to fire, lightning, explosion, theft, vandalism, malicious mischief or aircraft. Amounts and exclusions will vary. It’s important to read your policy and check with your broker if you have any questions.

Making Sure You’re Covered

Hopefully, your trees grow and endure. In the event that they fall, it’s important to know that you’re covered. Contact our office today to make sure that you have sufficient coverage for whatever might blow your way.

What You Need To Know Before You Lower Your Auto Insurance Limits

Auto Insurance Limits

Auto Insurance Limits

The cost of living can be pretty expensive. Everyone is looking for ways to cut costs and lower expenses. Auto insurance premiums are one expense many would like to lower. While you may be tempted to lower your auto insurance limits, make sure to weight out all the risks. 

Determining Which Coverage You Need

An auto insurance policy is designed to provide you with a level of protection in the event you are involved in an accident. This includes protection against property, liability and medical costs. Understanding the different parts of coverage is important when selecting your auto insurance limits. 

  • Property coverage pays for damage to or theft of your car.
  • Liability coverage pays for your legal responsibility to others for bodily injury or property damage. 
  • Medical coverage pays for the cost of treating injuries, rehabilitation and sometimes lost wages and funeral expenses. 
  • Underinsured motorists coverage pays for property damage and bodily injury caused by another driver whose coverage is insufficient to cover damages suffered.  

Selecting the correct liability limits is fundamental. On your auto insurance policy you will see your limits listed something like this – 100/300/50. In this example 100/300/50 means you are covered for up to $100,000 in bodily injury coverage per person, $300,000 in bodily injury coverage per accident and $50,000 in property damage per accident.

Many states have minimum liability limit requirements. You may be tempted to reduce your liability limits to the minimum legal level. Or even dropping underinsured motorists coverage. While it may reduce your premium, it could also subject you to substantial risks. 

Collision Coverage – Know The Value Of Your Car

Your policy will not pay for repairs that exceed the value of your vehicle. For this reason, if you are driving a vehicle that isn’t worth more than a few thousand dollars, it may not make sense to purchase collision coverage. Your agent can help you determine if collision insurance makes sense for you. 

Top Ways To Save On Your Auto Premiums

  • Consider raising your deductible.
  • Keep up your good driving record.
  • Drive less to qualify for a low-mileage discount.
  • Drive a car with safety features such as anti-lock brakes and airbags.
  • Install an anti-theft device.
  • Ask about our multi-policy discount. 

We’re here to help. Accidents happen to cautious drivers too. Having adequate auto insurance limits can save you from serious financial burden should you be involved in an accident. We can help you determine which auto insurance coverage is needed and what limits to purchase. 

5 Quick Tips About Motorcycle Safety

Motorcycle SafetySummer is in full swing and it’s time to get in a few road trips.  It is unfortunate, but there is a growing trend in the number of motorcycle accidents and fatalities each year, making motorcycle safety a real concern for riders and their families. There are many organizations that have created signs, commercials, radio ads, etc cautioning motorists to look out for motorcycles and they have done a great job in promoting safety for riders. As a motorcycle rider yourself, you also should do your part to ensure your own motorcycle safety. 

Regardless if you cruise across the country or across town, there are some universal motorcycle safety tips to keep in mind.

1) Always wear a helmet and other appropriate gear. Riding clothes should be bright, reflective or easy for passing or following motorists to see. Your motorcycle is smaller then the other vehicles on the road so make sure to make yourself as visible as possible. In the event of an accident, a helmet will help protect you from a fatal head injury.

2) Be cautious of the road conditions. Hazards such as potholes, cracks and bumps in the road and even road kill can throw you off balance and cause you to loose control of the motorcycle. Gravel roads can also be hazardous because of loose gravel which can cause you to skid. Rain can cause slippery roads from not only the water but oily road grime.

3) Do not drink alcohol or use drugs while operating a motorcycle. Just like in a motor vehicle you should never drink and drive. Alcohol and drugs will lower your response time and cloud your judgment. It’s especially dangerous on a motorcycle because there will be no metal frame surrounding your or airbags to deploy in the event of an accident.

4) Follow posted speed limits and road rules just like when you are in any other motor vehicle. Just because your motorcycle is smaller, stay in your lane of traffic. Do not weave in and out of traffic between cars, even at traffic stops, just because you can fit. Always use turn signals to warn motorists of your intentions.

5) Use extra caution when carrying passengers. There will be extra weight along with another person’s balance to adjust for. Inexperienced passengers will not know to lean into turns for example and can throw off the balance of the bike. If your passenger is inexperienced, go over a few “rules of the road” with them before you leave.  

Just like on your personal car or truck, you will also need to maintain insurance coverage on your motorcycle.

 

    • Liability Insurance Coverage will cover bodily injury and proper damage that you may cause to other people involved in an accident

 

    • Collision Insurance Coverage will cover damages, minus your deductible, to your motorcycle if you are involved in an accident.

 

    • Comprehensive Insurance Coverage will cover damages caused by an event other than a collision, such as fire, theft or vandalism and will be subject to your deductible

 

    • Uninsured/Underinsured Motorists Coverage will cover damages to you and our property caused by another driver that is uninsured or underinsured to cover your damages.

 

The safety of you and any passengers is the most important part of motorcycle safety. Have a fun, safe, rest of the summer and hit the road and see some amazing sites!! But don’t forget to review your insurance to ensure you understand your coverage and that it is up to date. Have questions? We can help!

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What You Need To Know About RV Insurance

RV InsuranceFamily time together, the open road, and visiting beautiful scenery. Those are just some of the benefits of having an RV or Travel Trailer. Whether you’re a weekend warrior or a full time travel buff, there’s lots to see on the open road. Your RV is your home away from home. That’s why you need to make sure it is protected. Just like you purchase Auto or Homeowners Insurance, you need RV Insurance to cover this investment. 

What is RV Insurance?

Travel trailer or RV Insurance has similar coverage to auto insurance, however it is more comprehensive and specialized for RV owners. RV Insurance is designed for the following vehicles:

  • Fifth-wheels
  • Pop-up campers
  • Stationary travel trailers
  • Park model travel trailers
  • Truck-mounted campers

Click here to read about auto insurance.

Types of Coverage Available:

A typical policy will include the following overages:

  • Comprehensive/Collision Coverage. Protects your RV from damages, such as fire, landslide, windstorm, vandalism and collision with another vehicle or objects. 
  • Liability-Only Travel Trailer Policy. Protects against accidental damage to other people’s property or personal injury to individuals not listed on your policy. 

Additional Endorsements:

Because RV Insurance is specialized coverage there are additional endorsements you can purchase. These endorsements let you add extra protection not included in a standard policy. These additional option include:

  • Emergency Expenses: Protection in case of a breakdown or damage to your RV or Travel Trailer.
  • Accessories Endorsements: For items attached to your trailer.
  • Full-timer Trailer Coverage: For those who live in their travel trailer most of the year.
  • Campsite/Vacation Liability: Coverage while your travel trailer is parked in an RV park. 
  • Low Branch Collision: Protection against damages from low-hanging branches to your trailer, awnings, and air conditioning units. 
  • Towing and Roadside Assistance
  • Total Loss Replacement

What Are The Benefits Of A RV Insurance Policy?

RV Insurance is specialized coverage different than auto insurance. When traveling in your RV, you will have additional items with you that you may not normally carry in your car. Jewelry, a computer, television, and camping gear are just a few examples. When you’re at a campsite, you are liable for other people’s safety around your trailer. Also, if you have an accident while traveling, you will need a place to stay  while the trailer is being repaired. Without an RV Insurance policy, none of these would be covered in the event of a loss. The biggest benefit is the peace of mind you receive. 

If you love the open road and seeking adventure, contact us today to get covered today. 

 

 

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