Do You Know The Difference Between Collision And Comprehensive Coverage?

Collision and Comprehensive Coverage

Collision and Comprehensive Coverage

Though state laws may not require you to purchase both collision and comprehensive coverage for your policy, doing so can protect your financial well-being. Read on to learn more about these types of coverage.

The Basics

Collision and comprehensive coverages provide financial safety nets in the event that your vehicle is physically damaged and needs to be repaired or replaced. Although these coverages are generally not required by state laws, they can reduce your financial hardship during a loss.
Also, if you are financing a loan for a car, your lender will most likely require both collision and comprehensive coverage as part of your car insurance policy.

Collision Coverage

Collision coverage pays for the cost to repair damages to a vehicle due to an accident, either with another vehicle or an object. Typically, you will collect only the actual cash value of your car versus the replacement cost value. Gap insurance protects you in the event you owe more than your vehicle is worth.

  • Collision coverage is generally the most expensive portion of a car insurance policy.
  • Premiums are based on a number of factors, including your deductible, driving record and the type of car you drive. If your driving record is fairly clean (no or very few tickets or accidents), your premiums will be lower because you are less likely to have a collision.

Comprehensive Coverage

Comprehensive coverage pays for damage to your vehicle that is caused by theft, vandalism, fire, natural disasters or hitting an animal.

  • Comprehensive coverage comes with a deductible and the insurer will only pay as much as the vehicle is worth at the time of the incident.
  • To calculate how much your car is worth, look up the Kelley Blue Book value or the National Automobile Dealers Association’s Official Used Car Guide value. If your car is low in value, the yearly premiums for comprehensive coverage may not be a sound investment.
  • Comprehensive coverage has many limitations, so it’s best to review your policy carefully to make sure you are properly covered.

We’re Here to Help

Call our office today at 419-522-9892 to learn more about collision and comprehensive coverage. Ask how we can protect you against losses.

4 Ways to Save on Your Auto Premiums:

1. Consider raising your deductible.
2. Maintain a clean driving record.
3. Establish a solid credit history.
4. Install an anti-theft device in your vehicle.

Halloween Doesn’t Need To Scare Your Bank Account

Halloween

Halloween

What do you get when you mix costumes, decorations, and candy? A Happy Halloween!!
Those that have children, probably feel the sting a little more while at the check-out. But Halloween doesn’t need to break the bank.

A few tips to keep in mind to help you save money

• Buy bulk candy to get the most for your money.
• Ration out how much you will give each Trick-or-Treater.
• Buy pumpkins close to Halloween to get the best deal.
• Make your own decorations – use leaves for stuffing in outside decorations, spray paint cardboard or cereal boxes for DIY headstones, or use cotton balls as cobwebs.
• Make your own costumes or only buy what you have to.

Halloween Safety Tips

In addition to saving money, your family’s safety is extremely important. Costumes, trick-or-treating and pumpkin carving are all Halloween traditions. But there are also dangers associated with each of those activities.

Costume Precautions

• Do not let children wear baggy or long costumes, as they are difficult to walk in and can be tripping hazards.
• Purchase wigs, costumes and accessories that are fire-retardant.
• Select face makeup and paint that is labeled as “FDA Approved” or “Non-toxic” to prevent allergic reactions.
• Place reflective tape on your children’s costumes and candy buckets if they are going trick-or-treating at night.

Trick-or-Treat Safety

• Remind children to walk only on the sidewalk and look both ways before crossing the street.
• Do not allow children under 12 years old to go trick-or-treating by themselves.
• Remind children to never approach or get into a car with a stranger offering them candy.
• Once your children get home, inspect their candy.

Pumpkin Carving Tips

• Only carve pumpkins on a flat surface with good lighting, such as a kitchen table.
• Use a pumpkin-carving kit that includes tools appropriate for the task.
• Place lit jack-o’-lanterns away from flammable objects such as sheets and curtains.
Having a good time does not mean spending a lot of money. Even on a budget you can have a spooky Happy Halloween!

Do I Have To Pay If A Tree Falls On My House?

tree falls

tree fallsEvery year, storms are responsible for knocking over or breaking off limbs of numerous trees. Unfortunately, sometimes, a limb or tree falls on our house or other property. Cleaning up the damage from a storm can be a difficult task, both physically and emotionally. And things can become especially tense when you discover that it’s your neighbor’s tree that damaged your house.

To make matters worse, many homeowners are surprised to discover that if a neighbor’s tree falls on their house, it’s usually their own homeowners policy—not their neighbor’s—that will cover the cost of the damages. What follows are general guidelines for who pays what in various situations. However, you should also check your homeowners policy for coverages and exclusions. (Click here to learn more about homeowners insurance policies)

Your Property, Your Policy

Generally speaking, if your property is damaged, you are responsible for the damages. It doesn’t matter if the tree or limb came from your property, your neighbor’s property or even municipal property. Keep in mind that a windstorm isn’t anyone’s fault; it’s an act of nature. If a tree does damage your property during a windstorm, your policy will cover the damages. After all, that’s why you purchased a homeowners policy. To protect yourself against unforeseen losses like a tree damaging your house.

Their Property, Their Policy

It might seem unfair that if it’s your neighbor’s tree that damages your home, you should have to pay. Fortunately for you, that standard applies both ways. If a storm rolls through and your tree falls and damages your neighbor’s house, his or her insurance is going to cover the damages.

Negligence and Liability

So far, these scenarios have been fairly straightforward. But what happens when it wasn’t a storm that made the tree fall? Instead, your neighbor’s tree was hollowed out from years of disease, and he’d neglected to do anything about it. In fact, it was so diseased that you expressed your concern to your neighbor that it might topple over and damage your property. Unfortunately, one day, that’s exactly what happens. What then?

Your insurance carrier is still going to be the one paying your claim. However, if you can prove your neighbor knew that the tree was diseased and that he or she neglected to fix it your insurance carrier would probably attempt to collect from your neighbor’s insurance. If your carrier is successful, you could be reimbursed for your deductible.

Remember, though, this rule also applies the other way. If you have diseased or damaged trees on your property and they damage your neighbor’s house, he or she can try to prove your negligence. Your property is your responsibility. So it’s best to inspect your trees every year for signs of disease or damage. If you’re not sure what you’re looking for, consider having a professional arborist examine your trees.

Other Structures

If the tree doesn’t damage your house but instead damages your fence, are you still covered? Generally, you are. Most homeowners policies distinguish between two different kinds of structures on your property. The “dwelling” refers to your house and any attached structures (like an attached garage), as well as any fixtures attached to the house. “Other structures,” including detached garages, sheds, fences or gazebos, are also insured, but typically only for 10 percent of the coverage on your dwelling.

Vehicles

If, in the aftermath of a storm, you discover that a tree has fallen on your car, your homeowners policy doesn’t apply. Instead, you’ll be looking at your auto policy. If you have comprehensive coverage on your vehicle, your auto insurance carrier will pay for the damages, after you pay your deductible. The same rule would apply to a guest’s car. Hopefully, he or she took out comprehensive coverage, too.(Click here to learn about auto insurance)

Removal and Cleanup

What if the tree fell but didn’t hit anything? Would you be covered for removal costs? If the fallen tree blocks a path to your front door or driveway, then many homeowners policies would pay for removal. Generally, the maximum coverage is around $500. If the tree simply falls in the middle of your yard, your policy likely wouldn’t cover it. Unless the fallen tree damaged insured property, there is no loss to file a claim for.

Replacement

Replacing the trees themselves can be more complicated. Trees that have fallen due to wind damage may or may not be covered, so it’s best to check with your broker. Most policies offer limited coverage for trees that have fallen due to fire, lightning, explosion, theft, vandalism, malicious mischief or aircraft. Amounts and exclusions will vary. It’s important to read your policy and check with your broker if you have any questions.

Making Sure You’re Covered

Hopefully, your trees grow and endure. In the event that they fall, it’s important to know that you’re covered. Contact our office today to make sure that you have sufficient coverage for whatever might blow your way.

Dealing with flu season and the COVID-19 Pandemic

flu season and the COVID-19 Pandemic

flu season and the COVID-19 PandemicThe arrival of the fall and winter months signals many things, including the beginning of flu season. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), flu activity peaks between December and February. This means that the COVID-19 pandemic isn’t the only public health concern as we approach the winter months. 2020 we will be dealing with flu season and the COVID-19 Pandemic.

This combination has public health experts fearing a potential “twindemic” in surges of COVID-19 cases and another deadly flu season. As such, the CDC is urging the public to take action to avoid another deadly flu season and prevent further spread of COVID-19 cases.

Flu vs. COVID-19 Symptoms

Because both the flu and COVID-19 affect the respiratory system, it can be difficult to determine whether you have the flu or COVID-19.

The flu is most often associated with the sudden onset of fever, headache, fatigue, muscle aches, congestion, cough and sore throat. Most people recover within a few days to less than two weeks. Occasionally, complications such as pneumonia, bronchitis or other infections can occur. Seasonal influenza can cause serious complications for people of any age, but children and the elderly are more vulnerable.

The list of COVID-19 symptoms is vast, and the disease affects people differently, with some experiencing little to no symptoms and others experiencing severe illness. Generally, symptoms can appear two to 14 days following exposure to COVID-19. According to the CDC, the most common COVID-19 symptoms include:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

Because there is some overlap between the symptoms, it may be difficult to determine whether you have the flu or COVID-19 without being tested. As such, if you believe you have the flu or COVID-19, please call your doctor and explain your symptoms before going to a facility to seek care. Doing so will ensure that you receive the care you need without risking the spread of COVID-19.

Prevention

In preparation for a potential twindemic this fall and winter, take these steps to protect yourself and loved ones:

  • Get the flu vaccine. The flu vaccine is your best chance of preventing the illness. Currently, the CDC recommends that anyone over 6 months of age receive an annual flu vaccine by the end of October. Talk to your doctor to learn more.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick, and stay away from others when you feel under the weather.
  • Practice social distancing, which means staying at least 6 feet away from others, when out in public.
  • Wear a protective face covering or cloth mask when out in public.
  • Avoid large gatherings, especially those that aren’t socially distanced and don’t require masks or face coverings.
  • Wash your hands often using soap and warm water to protect against germs. If soap and water aren’t available, use a hand sanitizer that’s been approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration.
  • Get plenty of sleep, stay physically active and drink plenty of water to keep your immune system strong.
  • Manage your stress and eat a nutritious diet rich in healthy grains, fruits, vegetables and fiber.

Click here to learn more about the CDC’s prevention recommendations for both the flu and COVID-19.

Take Action Today

Do your part to stay safe during the COVID-19 pandemic and flu season. By taking action, you can help prevent the spread of COVID-19 and another deadly flu season.

Answers To The 7 Most Frequently Asked Benefit Questions

Frequently Asked Benefit Questions

Frequently Asked Benefit QuestionsWhen it comes to benefits, such a health insurance, many can agree that it is confusing. Unless you are involved in health insurance or Human Resources it can be hard to make sense of everything. We have compiled a list of some of the 7 most frequently asked benefit questions and their answers. We hope this makes things a little easier to understand. 

What is a Deductible?

A deductible is the amount of money you or your dependents must pay toward a health claim before your organization’s health plan makes any payments for health care services rendered. For example, lets say you have a $1,000 deductible. You would be required to pay the first $1,000, in total, of any claims during a plan year.

What is Coinsurance?

On top of your deductible, coinsurance is a provision in your health plan that shows what percentage of a medical bill you pay and the percentage a health plan pays. This usually starts after your deductible has been satisfied.

What is an Out-of-pocket Maximum (OOPM)?

An OOPM is the maximum amount (deductible and coinsurance) that you will have to pay for covered expenses under a plan. Once the OOPM is reached the plan will cover eligible expenses at 100 percent.

What is an Explanation of Benefits (EOB)?

An EOB is a description your insurance carrier sends to you. It explains the health care benefits that you received and the services for which your health care provider has requested payment. It will explain what your insurance carrier will pay and an cost your will be responsible for. This would include Deductible, Coinsurance, Copays, etc.

What is a Preferred Provider Organization (PPO)?

A PPO is a group of hospitals and physicians that contract on a fee-for-service basis with insurance companies to provide comprehensive medical service. If you have a PPO, your out-of-pocket costs may be lower than in a non-PPO plan.

What is Utilization Management (UM)?

Utilization Management is the process of reviewing the appropriateness and the quality of care provided to patients. UM may occur before (pre-certification), during (concurrent) or after (retrospective) medical services are rendered. 

For example, your health plan may require you to seek prior authorization from your UM company before admitting you to a hospital for nonemergency care. This would be an example of pre-certification. Your medical care provider and a medical professional at the UM company will discuss what is the best course of treatment for you before care is delivered. UM can reduce unnecessary hospitalizations, treatment and costs.

What is a High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP)?

An HDHP is a type of insurance plan that offers a low premium offset by a high deductible. Because of the low cost of the plan, the insurer will not cover most medical expenses until the deductible is met. As an exception, preventive care services are typically covered before the deductible is met. HDHPs are often designed to be compatible with heath savings accounts (HSAs). HSAs are tax-advantaged accounts that can be used to pay for qualified out-of-pocket medical expenses before the HDHP’s deductible is met.

We hope you found this list of 7 most frequently asked benefit questions and their answers helpful. If you did, please take a moment to share this post. 

Would you like to know more about health insurance? Click here for Individual or Click here for Employee Benefits. 

If You Own A Child Care Business, You Need To Be Aware Of These Risks

child care








Owning and operating a child care business, such as a day care center or preschool program, can be a fulfilling experience. And, studies suggest an increasing number of parents are working full time. This means there are more opportunities for industry growth.However, with a higher number of families utilizing these services, it’s more important than ever that child care providers understand the risks and challenges associated with their business.

Child Safety

When operating a child care facility, safety is of the utmost concern. Inadequate policies or a single lapse in oversight can lead to serious injuries or even lawsuits.To ensure you are doing the most to protect the children in your care, it’s important to understand some common safety concerns and how to address them:

Lack of Supervision

Children in your care need to be watched closely at all times. Just one momentary distraction can result in an accident. To help prevent incidents and to ensure children are appropriately supervised, keep a low child-to-adult ratio. Experts suggest caregiver-to-child ratios should be at least 1:3 for infants and young toddlers, 1:6 for older toddlers and 1:9 for preschool-aged kids. Be sure to follow any state or local laws related to caregiver-to-child ratios.

Improper Medication Use

It may seem unlikely, but children can be accidentally poisoned quite easily if prescribed medications are administered improperly. To help prevent this, instruct parents to give their children medications at home whenever possible. If this is not possible, medications should be provided to your staff members in their original containers along with specific instructions. Staff members will also need to be trained on proper medication handling and storage. You should also have written parental authorization when it comes to administering medicine.

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

SIDS is the leading cause of death in infants between 1 month and 1 year of age. SIDS is generally the diagnosis given for the sudden death of children in this age group and has no known cause. However, there are a number of precautions you can take to ensure the safety of infants in your care:

  • Put babies to sleep on their backs.
  • Never place bumper pads, fluffy blankets or toys in cribs.
  • Avoid soft bedding.
  • Learn more by clicking here

The Presence of Toxic Substances

Accidental poisoning is a leading cause of death among children. As a child care facility, it is likely you will have harsh chemical cleaners, medicines and other potentially hazardous substances on-site. To safeguard children, it’s important to store these substances in locked, childproof cabinets. In addition, to prevent accidental poisoning, you should never store food and cleaning supplies in the same area.

Unsafe Toys or Equipment

Just because a product is made for children does not mean that it is safe. In fact, even when manufacturers test their products, safety issues can be easily overlooked, compounding injury risks for child care providers. To keep children safe:

  • Discard damaged toys. Inspect toys on a regular basis to ensure they are safe for children in your care.
  • Understand the intended use of toys and equipment you make available to children. Prevent children from using toys and equipment in an unsafe manner.
  • Stay up to date on toy and product recalls.
  • Keep play areas for younger and older children separate. This is particularly important when you consider that many toys are only appropriate for older age groups.
  • Ensure play areas are free of tripping and choking hazards.
  • Keep playground surfaces and equipment in good condition.

Poor Food Safety

There are a variety of risks associated with food for child care providers. For one, children are prone to choking and will need to be monitored during designated snack times. Also, foodborne illnesses can affect multiple children at once, making food safety all the more important. Instruct your staff to keep cooking surfaces, equipment and utensils clean to avoid cross contamination. In addition, food should be properly cooked, cut appropriately and allowed to cool before serving. It’s also important to be aware of any food allergies. Consider documenting these allergies so staff members can easily identify what foods are safe for each child in your care.

Maintaining a Clean and Healthy Facility

Ensuring the health of children and staff members alike can be a challenge for child care businesses. This is especially true when you consider that small children are vulnerable to a variety of illnesses and often carry germs that are easily spread to others. All it takes is one illness to infect all the children in your care as well as your staff. When this happens, not only can you experience staff shortages, but your child care facility can suffer serious reputational damage as well. It’s important to be proactive when it comes to protecting against contagious illnesses. The following are some tips to keep in mind:

  • Clean play areas daily, making sure to thoroughly sanitize all surfaces and toys.
  • Create and communicate a strict sick child policy. This policy should specify when children should stay home and procedures you will follow should a child get sick in your care.
  • Ensure staff members and children wash their hands regularly.

Staff Challenges

Hiring qualified and trustworthy staff members is critical to ensuring children receive the appropriate care. Poor employment practices can lead to safety hazards and affect your business’s bottom line. Child care facilities should be appropriately staffed. For added safety, and to avoid potential employee-related claims, consider doing the following:

  • Screen all of your employees, performing a detailed background check.
  • Ensure staff members are at least 18 years old.
  • Train staff members on child safety. Consider enrolling them in child-development related courses to further their education and learn new child care skills. Staff members should also be trained on pediatric CPR and first aid.
  • Create a reporting procedure for your staff members to follow should they suspect abuse, whether that abuse occurs in or outside of your facility.
  • Have at least two adults per each group of children in your care.
  • Hire enough staff to ensure children get the most one-on-one care possible. This can also protect you in the event that multiple staff members can’t come to work.

Behavior Concerns

As a child care provider, you must ensure children behave in a way that doesn’t jeopardize the safety of others in your care. However, this is easier said than done, and you must navigate potential disciplinary issues carefully. Just one poorly handled incident can lead to negative publicity or even costly litigation.

Your facility should have a clear disciplinary policy, to ensure behavior issues are addressed appropriately, . This policy should set expectations, account for appropriate disciplinary actions in a variety of scenarios and be communicated to parents. It’s also a good idea to keep a record of behavior issues and inform parents of recurring issues.

Above all, staff members should never physically discipline children. Staff members need to act tactfully when disciplining children, making sure to avoid any actions that could be considered verbal or psychological abuse. Thorough staff training is a must to ensure care providers know what is and isn’t appropriate when addressing child behavior concerns.

Further Managing Your Risks

There are considerable risks to consider when owning a child care business. While proactive risk management can help reduce potential liability concerns, the proper insurance coverage is equally important. To gain a better understanding of the risks associated with your operations and secure adequate coverage, contact us today or click here to learn more about business insurance. 








3 Ways Your Cell Phone Is Harming Your Sleep

harming your sleep








harming your sleepThe personal electronic devices that help make your daily life easier may be doing the opposite in regard to your nightly sleep habits. If you’re having a hard time falling and staying asleep, your cellphone, TV and tablet may be to blame. Keep reading so see how these devices are actually harming your sleep. 

The Negative Effects

Researchers at Harvard identified three main ways that using your phone, or any electronic device, before going to bed can derail your sleep schedule:

  1. Melatonin suppression. The Harvard study revealed that those who used electronic devices before going to sleep had lower levels of the sleep-regulating hormone, melatonin. That’s because the blue light emitted by electronic devices suppresses the production of melatonin. Melatonin controls your circadian rhythm—your body’s natural sleep and wake clock.
  2. Later sleep onset. The study also found that the amount of time it took to fall asleep was longer for those who used electronic devices than for those who didn’t. If you’re mindlessly scrolling through social media sites instead of reading a book or meditating, it’s more likely that you’ll have a harder time falling asleep.
  3. Reduced REM sleep. Research shows that electronic device usage before bed results in a reduced amount of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep cycles. REM sleep is a vital component of our sleep patterns.

What Can You Do?

To prevent the harmful effects of electronic devices, there are a few steps that you can take, including:

  • Check your device’s settings for a “nighttime” mode, which adjusts the screen lighting to promote sleep.
  • Refrain from using your phone for at least an hour before bed.
  • Set your device’s sound settings to “silent”. This way you won’t be woken by texts or emails while you’re trying to sleep.
  • Try reading a book or meditating to relax before bed instead of using your phone or watching TV.

Cell phones are an important part of our daily life, however take the above tips into consideration and quit harming your sleep. For more information on sleep-promoting activities, contact your doctor today.








5 Strategies You Need To Know To Reduce Benefits Costs In 2021

Reduce Benefits Costs








Reduce Benefits CostsHealth benefits costs are almost certainly going to rise in 2021. They’ve been trending upward for years—over 50% in the last decade, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation—and the current state of economic uncertainty over COVID-19 won’t slow things down. Realistically, after enduring months of business closures and managing exhausted workforces, many employers will be lucky to maintain uninterrupted operations.

That’s why it’s critical for employers to think about reducing health costs right now—figure out cost-effective benefits first so money can be shuffled as needed later. Having a solid plan going into 2021 will better position organizations facing limited budgets.
Here are five strategies employers should explore when looking to reduce benefits costs:

1. Dig Into Health Costs

Employers don’t let themselves overpay for the materials they use during production, so why is health care any different? Employers should look into every health care figure they can, from overall premium costs to individual employee expenditures. Understanding where money goes can help focus cost-cutting efforts.
For instance, if employees are going to the emergency room for every health visit, employers know they must promote more health literacy among their workforce.
Speak with Rinehart, Walters & Danner for details about digging into your health plan cost data.

2. Embrace Technology

The health care landscape of today is starkly different than the one of even a few years ago. Now, the name of the game is virtual health care or “telemedicine.” There are numerous ways for individuals to take charge of their health care without the hassle—and added cost—of in-person consultations.
For example, there is tech that can monitor glucose levels to help diabetic employees without test strips; there are virtual visits available for doctors, psychiatrists and other health professionals; and there are countless wellness apps that can help individuals make proactive health choices.

3. Consider Alternative Plan Options

Not every plan option will work for every organization. For years, PPOs were the standard, but now high deductible health plans with savings options are having their moment. These plans enable greater heath consumerism and put the decision-making power into employees’ hands. Employers should consider offering mechanisms like HSAs, FSAs and HRAs to help shift costs without compromising health care quality.

4. Require Active Enrollment

Some organizations allow employees to passively enroll in their health benefits. This may seem like a nice timesaver, but it can actually hinder employee health literacy. Instead, employers should require active enrollment among employees. This approach would force employees to review all their benefits options each year before making selections. Not only does this make employees consider important life events, it also affords them an opportunity to reevaluate the benefits they’re paying for and potentially not using. Ultimately, active enrollment can make employees wiser health care consumers, improve proactive health care and lower overall health expenditures.

5. Change the Funding Structure

Another, more drastic, cost-cutting strategy is changing how health plans are funded. Most organizations use a fully insured model, where employers pay a set premium to an insurance provider, but that’s not the only option. For some employers, self-funding, level-funding or reference-based pricing models may be more attractive solutions.

Let us help you review your options to reduce benefits costs

Suffice it to say, there are a variety of ways that employers can structure their health plans—even if that means requiring employees to seek insurance in the individual health market.

Whatever your needs, know that Rinehart, Walters & Danner is here to help. Contact us today to discuss your 2021 benefits and ways to reduce benefits costs.








What You Need To Know Before You Lower Your Auto Insurance Limits

Auto Insurance Limits








Auto Insurance Limits

The cost of living can be pretty expensive. Everyone is looking for ways to cut costs and lower expenses. Auto insurance premiums are one expense many would like to lower. While you may be tempted to lower your auto insurance limits, make sure to weight out all the risks. 

Determining Which Coverage You Need

An auto insurance policy is designed to provide you with a level of protection in the event you are involved in an accident. This includes protection against property, liability and medical costs. Understanding the different parts of coverage is important when selecting your auto insurance limits. 

  • Property coverage pays for damage to or theft of your car.
  • Liability coverage pays for your legal responsibility to others for bodily injury or property damage. 
  • Medical coverage pays for the cost of treating injuries, rehabilitation and sometimes lost wages and funeral expenses. 
  • Underinsured motorists coverage pays for property damage and bodily injury caused by another driver whose coverage is insufficient to cover damages suffered.  

Selecting the correct liability limits is fundamental. On your auto insurance policy you will see your limits listed something like this – 100/300/50. In this example 100/300/50 means you are covered for up to $100,000 in bodily injury coverage per person, $300,000 in bodily injury coverage per accident and $50,000 in property damage per accident.

Many states have minimum liability limit requirements. You may be tempted to reduce your liability limits to the minimum legal level. Or even dropping underinsured motorists coverage. While it may reduce your premium, it could also subject you to substantial risks. 

Collision Coverage – Know The Value Of Your Car

Your policy will not pay for repairs that exceed the value of your vehicle. For this reason, if you are driving a vehicle that isn’t worth more than a few thousand dollars, it may not make sense to purchase collision coverage. Your agent can help you determine if collision insurance makes sense for you. 

Top Ways To Save On Your Auto Premiums

  • Consider raising your deductible.
  • Keep up your good driving record.
  • Drive less to qualify for a low-mileage discount.
  • Drive a car with safety features such as anti-lock brakes and airbags.
  • Install an anti-theft device.
  • Ask about our multi-policy discount. 

We’re here to help. Accidents happen to cautious drivers too. Having adequate auto insurance limits can save you from serious financial burden should you be involved in an accident. We can help you determine which auto insurance coverage is needed and what limits to purchase. 








Important Insurance Tips For Your College Student

Insurance tips for your college student








Insurance tips for your college student

High School is over and it’s time for the next big step, college. The new students schedule is done, books are purchased and the day is approaching fast for the big move. New furniture, décor and electronics are all packed and ready to go. Before your college student can begin their next adventure you have one last item to complete on your check list. Talking with your insurance agent. While that may seem like an odd item to have on your checklist, it is probably one of the most important. Your insurance agent will have important insurance tips for your college student. When your child leaves home and takes up a new residence at college, that can affect how their belongings are covered. Below are a few questions you may have when it comes to insurance and your college student.

Will my college student’s belongings be covered by my homeowners policy?

Does your child lives in a campus dorm? There is usually a small amount of coverage that would be extended from your homeowners policy. If your child has expensive items, or a lot of items, you may need to consider purchasing additional coverage. Does your child lives in off campus housing? Their belongings may not be covered at all.

Is renters insurance really necessary?

Yes. Chances are your child’s belongings will exceed the amount provided by your homeowners policy, if they are even covered at all. Renters insurance will cover the possessions in your child’s housing at a small cost. You can purchase renters insurance for as little as $15 per month. This will not only give you the extra coverage, but peace of mind that that expensive new laptop or TV will be protected in the event of fire, theft, or other disaster.

In addition to your college students belongings, the move to college can affect your auto coverage and health coverage.

Will your child move more than 100 miles away from home?

If this answer is yes and they do not keep a vehicle at school, your insurance premiums could decrease by as much as 30%. If they are taking a car with them, be sure to review your auto coverage with your agent. Make sure you have the appropriate coverage and your child understands how it works in the event of a claim.

Does my child need to purchase health insurance?

In the state of Ohio, many health insurance carriers are now required to coverage children up to age 26. This rule applies regardless of full time student status. Be sure to review your health coverage to verify the dependent age limit on your plan. Also, make sure your child has an ID card with them if they should need to see a Dr or get a Prescription. They should also understand how the coverage works and if there is any copay they will be responsible for if they should have to use the coverage.

Sending a child to college can be a scary yet exciting time for everyone. When you add your insurance agent to your list of people to talk to during this transition, it can help give you peace of mind for you and your child’s future insurance needs. Remember, your agent is a great source for insurance tips for your college student.

Did you find this information helpful? Please share this information.