6 Tips For Driving In The Rain and Thunderstorms

Driving In The Rain

Driving In The RainDriving in the rain or during a thunderstorm can be pretty nerve-wracking for most people. Worrying about having an accident or being stuck on the side of the road can be very overwhelming. It can also be very dangerous. However, a few tips and adjustments can take away some of the anxiety and help you stay calm during your commute.

Driving in the rain and thunderstorms

If you happen to get caught driving in the rain or thunderstorm, don’t panic . There a extra precautions you can take to make your trip a safe one.

A few tips to keep in mind:

  1. Turn on your headlights, wipers and defroster to increase visibility.
  2. Drive in the tracks of vehicles ahead of you and reduce your speed.
  3. Allow for increased space between your vehicle and the one in front of you.
  4. If you hydroplane, hold the steering wheel straight and remove your foot from the gas.
  5. Do not use cruse control during inclimate weather.
  6. Pull off the road in an open area away from trees to avoid a lightning strike.

Helping you to avoid claims is just one of the many value-added services we provide. In the unfortunate event you do have an accident, we will help you through the process. Give us a call during business hours or click here to view our after hours claim contacts. 

What You Need To Know About RV Insurance

RV InsuranceFamily time together, the open road, and visiting beautiful scenery. Those are just some of the benefits of having an RV or Travel Trailer. Whether you’re a weekend warrior or a full time travel buff, there’s lots to see on the open road. Your RV is your home away from home. That’s why you need to make sure it is protected. Just like you purchase Auto or Homeowners Insurance, you need RV Insurance to cover this investment. 

What is RV Insurance?

Travel trailer or RV Insurance has similar coverage to auto insurance, however it is more comprehensive and specialized for RV owners. RV Insurance is designed for the following vehicles:

  • Fifth-wheels
  • Pop-up campers
  • Stationary travel trailers
  • Park model travel trailers
  • Truck-mounted campers

Click here to read about auto insurance.

Types of Coverage Available:

A typical policy will include the following overages:

  • Comprehensive/Collision Coverage. Protects your RV from damages, such as fire, landslide, windstorm, vandalism and collision with another vehicle or objects. 
  • Liability-Only Travel Trailer Policy. Protects against accidental damage to other people’s property or personal injury to individuals not listed on your policy. 

Additional Endorsements:

Because RV Insurance is specialized coverage there are additional endorsements you can purchase. These endorsements let you add extra protection not included in a standard policy. These additional option include:

  • Emergency Expenses: Protection in case of a breakdown or damage to your RV or Travel Trailer.
  • Accessories Endorsements: For items attached to your trailer.
  • Full-timer Trailer Coverage: For those who live in their travel trailer most of the year.
  • Campsite/Vacation Liability: Coverage while your travel trailer is parked in an RV park. 
  • Low Branch Collision: Protection against damages from low-hanging branches to your trailer, awnings, and air conditioning units. 
  • Towing and Roadside Assistance
  • Total Loss Replacement

What Are The Benefits Of A RV Insurance Policy?

RV Insurance is specialized coverage different than auto insurance. When traveling in your RV, you will have additional items with you that you may not normally carry in your car. Jewelry, a computer, television, and camping gear are just a few examples. When you’re at a campsite, you are liable for other people’s safety around your trailer. Also, if you have an accident while traveling, you will need a place to stay  while the trailer is being repaired. Without an RV Insurance policy, none of these would be covered in the event of a loss. The biggest benefit is the peace of mind you receive. 

If you love the open road and seeking adventure, contact us today to get covered today. 

 

 

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Do You Have Allergies? 6 Helpful Tips For Allergy

Allergies








Allergies

Between the rain, new growth and house cleaning, chances are if you have allergies, you are miserable right about now. Whether you have seasonal allergies or suffer year round, there are steps you can take to help decrease your symptoms without having to stock up on medication.

Who is affected by allergies?

Though allergies can affect anyone, individuals with the following characteristics are afflicted more often:

  • Under 40 years old
  • Have at least one parent with allergies
  • Suffer from allergic conditions such as asthma

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms of allergies include:

  • Sneezing
  • Red, itchy or watery eyes
  • Dry throat
  • Stuffy nose

Tips to alleviate allergy symptoms:

To alleviate allergy symptoms, consider the following recommendations:

  1. Stay indoors when the pollen count outside is high.
  2. Keep your home clean and as dust-free as possible.
  3. Place pillows, mattresses and duvets in allergen-proof encasements.
  4. Use a vacuum cleaner with double bags, allergen-trapping bags or a HEPA filter.
  5. Avoid having pets or going near others’ pets if you have animal allergies.
  6. In your home, choose hardwood floors instead of carpeting.

Did you know?

According to the American Academy of Allergy and Immunology, about half of the U. S. population suffers from allergies. These negative reactions occur as a result of coming in contact with normally harmless substances. Some allergies change or disappear over time, while seasonal attacks will return at the same time each year for only a few weeks or months.

Healthy Hints

Treatment for most allergy symptoms is available over-the-counter or as a prescription from your physician. If your symptoms are severe or you don’t know what is causing you to have a reaction, an allergist can perform a test to pinpoint what you are allergic to. And don’t forget, allergy testing and treatment is usually covered by your health insurance.

Do you need help finding what your copay or out of pocket cost will be?

Call us today – 419-522-9892 – we can help.








6 Important Safety Tips for Senior Drivers

senior drivers

As we get older we get wiser, and for some of us that wisdom brings along with it the realization that we just can’t do some things like we used to. The key is realizing that you may need to take some extra precautions to ensure the safety of yourself and those around you on the road. That is why we have complied this list of tips for senior drivers. 

Driving Tips for Senior Drivers

  1. Avoid driving during rush hour. The traffic is usually heavy, and other drivers can be impatient.
  2. Avoid driving at night or in bad weather, especially if your vision is limited.
  3. Consider taking a safety driving course for seniors. These refresher classes will help you to brush up on your skills and meet some new people.
  4. Plan your route before leaving the driveway. Know exactly where you want to travel and how you need to get there. If you are unsure about your route, get exact directions.
  5. Keep yourself in good health by doing the following:
    • Exercise your upper body to keep it flexible. This will help you look over your shoulder at your blind spot.
    • Get regular vision checkups and have your lenses updated if you wear glasses and have a prescription change.
  6. Remember that certain medications or a combination of medications can cause drowsiness or fatigue. Talk with your doctor about potential side effects to medications you are taking, even those that are over-the-counter.

Safety First

Plan ahead for when you can no longer drive yourself around. Talk with family and friends to learn more about alternative ways to travel, such as public transportation and ride service programs. Or, establish a plan with your loved ones regarding how you will travel once you can no longer drive safely on your own.

Don’t Forget to Review Your Insurance Coverage

If you are not completing an annual review with your agent, you need to. Age could affect your auto insurance rates and coverage. Make sure your plan fits your needs. You can click here to learn more or give your agent a call today at 800-837-9969. 

How To Avoid Burnout While Working From Home Due To COVID-19

working from home

working from home

For many workers, their new “normal” routine consists of getting out of bed and logging on to work. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has shifted the workplace from the office to kitchen tables and living rooms for thousands of employees. Our new “normal” is working from home.

This shift to telecommuting has made it possible for employees to work while staying safe and preventing the spread of COVID-19, but it has also created a few challenges, including increased levels of stress and burnout.

What is burnout?

According to the World Health Organization, doctors can diagnose you with burnout if you exhibit the following symptoms:

  • Exhaustion or energy depletion
  • Decreased engagement at work, or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to your job
  • Reduced productivity or efficacy

The negative effects of burnout can extend beyond the workplace and into your home and social life. It can also increase your risk of getting sick and developing chronic conditions.

What are the signs of burnout?

Since burnout is the result of prolonged and chronic workplace stress, it’s important to know how to recognize the signs of workplace stress. Common job stressors include:

  • Heavy workload
  • Long work hours
  • Lack of work-life balance
  • Concerns over job security

While dealing with stress is a normal part of everyday life, and these uncertain times may be elevating your overall stress levels, it’s important to watch out for prolonged stress. Here are some early warning signs of burnout:

  • Anxiety or depression
  • Low morale
  • Short temper
  • Headache
  • Stomach or back problems
  • Fatigue

If you experience any of these symptoms, it may be time to talk to your supervisor or manager to address your chronic stress.

How to Prevent Burnout While Working From Home

Fortunately, there are steps you can take to reduce your stress, and your risk of burnout, while you work from home. Here are some simple tips to try:

  • Create a schedule—When you’re at home, it can be difficult to step away from work when your day is done, which often results in you working longer hours than normal. Set a schedule and only work the hours your normally would if you were in the office.
  • Plan and prioritize—When you’re feeling stressed out, don’t panic. Make a list of the tasks you need to complete, and set realistic deadlines.
  • Set up a separate workspace—One way to make it easier to maintain a work-life balance while you’re working from home is to set up a space where you’ll work. This will help you decompress from work when your day is done.
  • Focus on what you can control—You know what your job tasks are. Break the larger tasks into smaller, more doable steps.
  • Take breaks throughout the day—Getting a change of scenery and a brief break during the workday can help you clear your mind and reduce your stress.
  • Slow down—When you have a lot of tasks looming over you, it can be tempting to hurry through them just to get them off your plate. Rushing through tasks, though, can cause you to feel more stressed and increase the odds of mistakes being made. Take a deep breath when you start to get overwhelmed, and slow down.
  • Maintain a good attitude—Try to think positively about tasks at work—avoid negative thinkers and always acknowledge your accomplishments, even if it’s just by mentally congratulating yourself.
  • Ask for help—Sometimes the best way to overcome your workplace stress is to ask peers or your superiors for help.
  • Communication is key—While you’re working from home, it’s important that you regularly communicate with your team and co-workers. Doing so will help ensure that expectations can be properly set and managed during the time you’re working from home.

What should I do if I think I’m experiencing burnout?

If you feel like you’re burned out, you should talk to your supervisor or manager, as they may be able to help you reduce your workplace stress or direct you to valuable workplace resources, like an employee assistance program.

Talking to other co-workers, friends or family may also be helpful, as they may have insight into how you can reduce your stress and improve your burnout syndrome. Implementing healthy stress coping mechanisms, such as exercising, hanging out with friends or taking time off from work, can also help alleviate your stress.

For more information on burnout, click here.

3 Tips For An Injury Free Workout

workout

workout

Exercise is a great way to combat stress, lose weight and boost your energy. To get the most from your workout, it is important that you add warming up, cooling down and stretching to your exercise routine. These three simple steps are proven to prevent painful and costly injuries later.

Warming Up

Warming up allows your body time to adjust from rest to activity. It increases blood flow to the muscles so they stretch easily, reducing the risk of muscle tears. It also lubricates joints and carries oxygen to the heart.
To effectively warm up:
• Use movements that are similar to those you will use in your workout, such as light calisthenics, walking, jogging, etc.
• Gradually increase the intensity of your warm-up.
• Don’t overdo it! Your warm-up should be about 15 minutes and intense enough to cause a light sweat.

Cooling Down

As with warming up, cooling down should include movements similar to those in your workout, but at a gradually decreasing level of intensity.

Stretching

After cooling down, stretching helps to build flexibility and range of motion. When stretching:
• Use gentle and fluid movements and breathe normally.
• Work specific parts of your body, maintaining each stretch for 20 to 60 seconds.
• Never force a joint beyond its normal range of motion; you should not feel any pain.

Workout Healthy Hints

Many muscle and bone injuries are the result of skipping a warm-up and cool-down before and after exercise. Remember, preventing an injury is easier, cheaper and less painful than trying to recover from one.

Telecommuting, Is It Right For Your Business?

Telecommuting

Telecommuting

Telecommuting is the term for working from a remote location, usually an employee’s residence. Workers are connected to employers and company servers via the internet and are able to communicate regularly in real time using email, instant messaging, webcams and conference calls. Telecommuting can range from working exclusively from a home office to only working at home a few hours every week.

History and Prevalence

The term “telecommuting” was coined in the early 1970s by a University of Southern California professor researching communication and transportation. Companies and government offices began seriously promoting the idea later that decade during the energy crisis.

Technological innovation allowed telecommuting to increase over the next three decades. By 2011, data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics showed that 24 percent of employed Americans work from home on a weekly basis. Another survey by Global Workplace Analytics showed that the rate of telecommuting had increased 73 percent since 2005, and that 2.5 percent of the non-self-employed workforce (roughly 3 million people) primarily works from home.

But while the overall usage of telecommuting has steadily increased, many companies have chosen not to adopt it, and some have chosen to push back. For example, in 2013, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer prohibited telecommuting in her offices, where it had been established company policy. Yahoo’s shift in policy highlighted some of the downfalls of this way of conducting business.

Pro and Cons

Telecommuting brings advantages and disadvantages to the way companies do business. Here’s a look at some of them the pros.

  • Increased productivity. While it’s easy to imagine workers shirking their duties at home more readily than in the office, numerous studies show that workers who telecommute are 15 to 55 percent more productive. Two-thirds of employers report increased productivity among their telecommuters.
    • Additionally, AT&T reports that employees work an extra five hours per week when telecommuting versus when they are at the office, and Sun Microsystems’ data shows that employees spend 60 percent of the time they would have used commuting working for the company.
  • Fewer costs. Over half of all employers reported cost savings as a significant benefit to telecommuting. By allowing workers to telecommute, companies reported big savings on real estate, absenteeism and relocation costs. In many areas there are also grants and other financial incentives for companies that offer telecommuting.
  • Increased employer flexibility. Telecommuting gives employers the option to hire from across the country without worrying about relocating workers to a central location. Employers can also more readily hire part-time, semi-retired, disabled or homebound workers.
  • Healthier employees. Telecommuting relieves the stress caused by commuting and other issues related to the workplace or being away from home. Telecommuters eat healthier and exercise more than their office-bound counterparts, and are less likely to get sick from contagious germs.

Below are some of the potential disadvantages of telecommuting:

  • Disengagement. Many employers say that telecommuting interferes negatively with the relationship between workers and management, and can foster jealousy and rivalries between telecommuters and non-telecommuters. Staying connected and supervising employees who work from home can also be a challenge for managers.
  • Lack of collaboration. Innovation can be stifled when workers are not physically interacting with each other. This is the main reason cited by Mayer for the discontinuation of Yahoo’s telecommuting policy.
  • Technology and security concerns. Not all employees are tech-savvy, and there can be problems trying to remotely access an office network or set up remote meetings. Sensitive company information carries the potential for greater risk of being compromised through unsecure home computers. Additionally, 59 percent of telecommuters do not use their company’s data backup system, risking the loss of hard work and valuable information.

Legal Issues

In addition to the strengths and weaknesses of telecommuting, employers must recognize legal issues associated with it before deciding it is right for them. The following are legal issues that may need to be addressed.

Property

Make sure you have a clearly stated company policy for employees who are issued company electronics that addresses what to do in the event they are lost, damaged or stolen. Consider insuring more expensive items.

One way to handle company property issues is to have a written policy in place. If you are issuing electronics to your employees, have them sign something that acknowledges their receipt of the equipment, and indicates who is responsible for maintenance and damages.

Privacy

Employees should be made aware of their privacy rights when working from home. Just because work is being performed on a home computer doesn’t mean that it’s exempt from being monitored or inspected by the employer. Though the location may be personal, employees are still acting under the scope of employment.

Security and Confidentially

Security concerns arise with workers accessing company information from their home computers. One way to guard against intentional leaking is to require that telecommuters sign a nondisclosure agreement. Have your company outline security measures employees should follow to protect information on their computers from exposure to external forces.

Payroll Records and Compensation

Telecommuting presents difficulties for employers in complying with hourly recordkeeping regulations. Employers with telecommuters should set up a way to track those hours and ensure their accuracy.

Similarly, federal rules on overtime and rest and meal breaks apply to telecommuters as much as they do to employees in the workplace. This makes an employer’s obligation to track employee hours especially important.

Employer Liability

What happens if an employee slips and falls at home, while on the clock? Or what if an employee commits a crime in the scope of his or her employment while telecommuting? What about workers’ compensation?

Employer liability remains a considerable concern for telecommuting employees. For starters, you should have a specific policy in place to address work-related injuries or torts that occur at a telecommuting employee’s home office.

Overtime Pay

Allowing employees to work remotely outside of normal work hours (for example, checking their emails at night) could trigger overtime wage issues for certain eligible employees under the provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). An employee working remotely is performing compensable work if he or she is completing a principal activity, or if he or she is on duty.

If employees are performing compensable work and are not covered by an FLSA exemption, they are entitled to overtime pay. FLSA violations can lead to lawsuits, criminal charges and fines. For more information on overtime compliance, contact Rinehart, Walters & Danner.

In Summary

Telecommuting is not the right fit for every company, but it has a decades-old record of being positive for many organizations. As the business world becomes more ensconced online than ever before, and a younger, more internet-connected generation moves up the ranks of the workforce, telecommuting may become far more common than it is today.

Before your company decides to embrace telecommuting, you should carefully weigh the risks and benefits of instituting a telecommuting policy to ensure it will be an asset to your organization.

How To Safely Grocery Shop During the Coronavirus Outbreak

safely grocery shop

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has disrupted everyday life in many ways. Many states have ordered residents to stay at home and avoid any unnecessary contact with others. That being said, you still have to eat. It is important that you take precautions in all parts of your life, even when you’re just taking a trip to the grocery store. We have a few tips to help you safely grocery shop. 

GROCERY SHOPPING PRECAUTIONS

When you have to go to the grocery store, remember the following tips in order to keep yourself as safe as possible:
Limit your visits—The more often you go to the store, the more likely you are to come into contact with someone, or something, that may be carrying COVID-19. Make a list of what you need before going shopping so that you do not need to return unnecessarily.
Time your trips—Be smart about choosing when to take your trip to the store. If possible, go during times that are less busy. The fewer people who are in the store, the less likely you are to come into contact with the disease. If you are a senior citizen, check if nearby stores are offering specific shopping hours for you.
Prepare properly—Wash your hands before you go shopping in order to reduce the risk of spreading germs to others. Some stores are offering free hand sanitizer or disinfectant wipes for guests to use. When you arrive, be sure to sanitize the handle of your grocery cart or basket.
Distance yourself—While at the store, stay at least 6 feet away from others. If you need to get to the other side of a crowded aisle, take the long way around in order to avoid squeezing through a herd of shoppers.
Watch what you touch—Avoid picking up any product unless you are certain that you intend to purchase it. It is possible that you may come into contact with a product that another shopper previously examined. Avoid touching your face while shopping.
Don’t use cash—You can lessen your risk of picking up germs by using a debit or credit card to pay for your groceries. Avoiding the exchange of cash and coins reduces your chance of spreading germs to others, or vice versa.
Disinfect—The battle does not end once you leave the store. When you arrive back home, it is possible that you have just brought germs back with you. Research has shown that COVID-19 can live for up to 24 hours on cardboard and as long as three days on plastic and stainless steel. As such, you should wash your hands and disinfect all nonporous containers and any surfaces that your grocery bags may have touched. If you use reusable bags to shop, you should also wash them between each use.
COVID-19 can spread easily and, although many nonessential businesses have been ordered to close, necessary operations like grocery stores still bear a great deal of risk for anyone who visits them. It is up to you to take on the responsibility of protecting yourself and others by committing to safe habits while shopping. Take extra precautions when you have to go out to safely grocery shop and keep yourself and your family healthy.  

Identity Theft and What You Need To Know

Identity Theft








Identity Theft

Matt and Lisa have the perfect date night planned. Dinner, theater, then desert. However, that perfect date night quickly turns into a disaster when Matt goes to pay for the dinner. Both his debit card and credit card are declined. With the mood for the night now ruined, they return home and start making phone calls to find out what is going on. They quickly determine that the checking account has been drained and the credit card is maxed out and all the purchases were made several states away. Matt has been an unfortunate victim of identity theft.

What is identity theft?

Identity theft occurs when personal information such as Social Security numbers, bank account information or credit card numbers are obtained without permission. Once thieves have this information, they can use existing credit cards or open new ones, make purchases in the victims name, write bad checks, even take out loans. If the theft is not recognized immediately, a victims credit score could be tarnished without them realizing it. The FTC estimates that 17.6 million Americans have their identities stolen annually.

How can thieves steal your identity?

There are a number of ways that thieves can still your identity but the most common means are:

  • Dumpster Diving – thieves rummage through your trash looking of bills or other papers with personal information.
  • Skimming – Thieves steal credit and/or debit card numbers by using a special storage device when processing your card.
  • Phishing – Thieves pretend to be financial institutions and send spam e-mails and pop-up messages to your computer to get you to reveal personal information.
  • Changing your address – Thieves divert your billing statements to another location
  • Stealing (the old-fashioned way) – Thieves take your purse or wallet, bank or credit card statements, pre-approved credit offers and tax information from your mailbox.
  • Pretexting – Thieves use false pretenses to obtain your personal information from financial institutions, and use that information to make changes.

Signs of identity theft.

Stay alert for any of the following signs of identity theft:

  • Accounts you did not open and debits on your account that you cannot explain.
  • Fraudulent or inaccurate information on your credit report.
  • Failing to receive bills in the mail.
  • Receiving credit cards in the mail that you did not apply for.
  • Being denied credit or being offered less favorable credit terms, such as a higher interest rate, for no apparent reason.
  • Receiving calls and letters from debt collectors about merchandise/services that you did not purchase.

Do I need Identity theft insurance coverage?

While identity theft insurance does not protect against actual monetary theft, it does cover the cost victims will incur while they are recovering their identity. The coverage may include:

  • Phone call and photocopying charges
  • Postage fees for mailing documents
  • Salary loss due to uncompensated time away from work while repairing one’s identity
  • Legal fees
  • Access to a fraud specialist who can assist in restoring good credit and protecting one’s identity again
  • Help with preparing documents, filing police reports and creating a fraud victim affidavit.

Since victims may spend a considerable amount of time recovering from identity theft, these services can make the situation a little less stressful. Both on the mind and your wallet.

In addition to identity theft insurance you should also make sure to protect your social security number, take caution when throwing documents in the trash, exercise caution on the internet, select intricate passwords , verify sources before giving out any personal information and check your credit report on an annual basis. Life is stressful enough, the last thing you want is the additional stress of identity theft. By taking extra precautions and purchasing identity theft insurance you can have some extra peace of mind that your identity is safe.

Interested in purchasing identity theft coverage? Information can be found by clicking here.








Maintaining Mental Well-Being During A Quarantine

Mental Well-Being

Mental Well-Being

In response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization have recommended that individuals who may have been exposed to the disease self-quarantine at home for 14 days. In addition, public health officials are recommending that healthy individuals practice social distancing, staying at home to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Following the advice of public health officials can help stop the spread of COVID-19, but if you don’t take proper precautions, your mental well-being could suffer while you’re quarantining.

If you’re self-quarantining or practicing social distancing, keep the following tips in mind to maintain your mental well-being.

Maintain a Routine

One of the best things that you can do to preserve your mental well-being is to stick to a routine. For example, if you’re used to going to the gym before work, try to wake up early and get an at-home workout in before you go to work or start your workday from home. Maintaining as much normalcy as possible with your daily routine can help keep your mood as lifted as possible, and prevent boredom and distress from taking over.

If you have children that will be at home now, it’s also important to create a routine for them. Whether they re practicing virtual learning with their schools or if they will just be home, you should implement a structured schedule for them so they know what your expectations are. Try to limit as much screen time as possible and incorporate learning activities throughout the day.

Get a Good Night’s Sleep

This suggestion goes hand-in-hand with sticking to a routine. While you’re at home, it can be easy to go to bed or sleep in later than you typically would. Breaking your normal sleep routine can have negative effects on your overall mental well-being, so you should try to stick to your typical schedule as much as possible.

Spend Time Outside

Unless health officials give you explicit instructions to stay in your home no matter what, try to get outside periodically throughout the day. This could involve going out in your backyard or taking a walk around the block, but shouldn’t include going to a park or other areas where large groups of people may be.

Being outside also helps to promote higher vitamin D levels, a vitamin the body makes when skin is directly exposed to the sun. Many people are deficient in vitamin D, so exercising outside can be a great way to correct that.

Leverage the Power of Technology

When in quarantine or self-isolation, it can be easy to feel lonely. Fortunately, advancements in technology have made it easy to connect with others without having to physically be in contact with them. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) recommends reaching out to loved ones with technology to reduce feelings of loneliness and anxiety, and to supplement your social life while you’re quarantining or social distancing. If you’re feeling down, use video calling technology or social media to get in touch with friends and family.

Don’t Obsess Over the News

It can be easy to become overwhelmed by watching the news and reviewing the updates of the COVID-19 situation. While it’s important to be informed of the situation, you should not obsess over the news. For example, instead of monitoring the news all day from home, consider checking for updates once in the morning and once at night.

Practice Positivity and Gratitude

Taking five minutes a day to write down the things that you are grateful for has been proven to lower stress levels and can help you change your mindset from negative to positive. While you’re quarantining or social distancing, it’s important to build time into your routine to practice positivity or express gratitude to change your mindset on your situation and boost your mood.

Summary

Your mental well-being plays a huge role in your overall health and well-being, and it should be prioritized. These six suggestions may help you maintain your mental well-being during a quarantine, but shouldn’t be considered as medical advice.

If you have concerns about your mental well-being while you’re in quarantine, please contact your mental health professional or use SAMHSA’s National Helpline by calling 800-662-HELP (4357).