3 Ways Your Cell Phone Is Harming Your Sleep

harming your sleep

harming your sleepThe personal electronic devices that help make your daily life easier may be doing the opposite in regard to your nightly sleep habits. If you’re having a hard time falling and staying asleep, your cellphone, TV and tablet may be to blame. Keep reading so see how these devices are actually harming your sleep. 

The Negative Effects

Researchers at Harvard identified three main ways that using your phone, or any electronic device, before going to bed can derail your sleep schedule:

  1. Melatonin suppression. The Harvard study revealed that those who used electronic devices before going to sleep had lower levels of the sleep-regulating hormone, melatonin. That’s because the blue light emitted by electronic devices suppresses the production of melatonin. Melatonin controls your circadian rhythm—your body’s natural sleep and wake clock.
  2. Later sleep onset. The study also found that the amount of time it took to fall asleep was longer for those who used electronic devices than for those who didn’t. If you’re mindlessly scrolling through social media sites instead of reading a book or meditating, it’s more likely that you’ll have a harder time falling asleep.
  3. Reduced REM sleep. Research shows that electronic device usage before bed results in a reduced amount of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep cycles. REM sleep is a vital component of our sleep patterns.

What Can You Do?

To prevent the harmful effects of electronic devices, there are a few steps that you can take, including:

  • Check your device’s settings for a “nighttime” mode, which adjusts the screen lighting to promote sleep.
  • Refrain from using your phone for at least an hour before bed.
  • Set your device’s sound settings to “silent”. This way you won’t be woken by texts or emails while you’re trying to sleep.
  • Try reading a book or meditating to relax before bed instead of using your phone or watching TV.

Cell phones are an important part of our daily life, however take the above tips into consideration and quit harming your sleep. For more information on sleep-promoting activities, contact your doctor today.

5 Strategies You Need To Know To Reduce Benefits Costs In 2021

Reduce Benefits Costs

Reduce Benefits CostsHealth benefits costs are almost certainly going to rise in 2021. They’ve been trending upward for years—over 50% in the last decade, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation—and the current state of economic uncertainty over COVID-19 won’t slow things down. Realistically, after enduring months of business closures and managing exhausted workforces, many employers will be lucky to maintain uninterrupted operations.

That’s why it’s critical for employers to think about reducing health costs right now—figure out cost-effective benefits first so money can be shuffled as needed later. Having a solid plan going into 2021 will better position organizations facing limited budgets.
Here are five strategies employers should explore when looking to reduce benefits costs:

1. Dig Into Health Costs

Employers don’t let themselves overpay for the materials they use during production, so why is health care any different? Employers should look into every health care figure they can, from overall premium costs to individual employee expenditures. Understanding where money goes can help focus cost-cutting efforts.
For instance, if employees are going to the emergency room for every health visit, employers know they must promote more health literacy among their workforce.
Speak with Rinehart, Walters & Danner for details about digging into your health plan cost data.

2. Embrace Technology

The health care landscape of today is starkly different than the one of even a few years ago. Now, the name of the game is virtual health care or “telemedicine.” There are numerous ways for individuals to take charge of their health care without the hassle—and added cost—of in-person consultations.
For example, there is tech that can monitor glucose levels to help diabetic employees without test strips; there are virtual visits available for doctors, psychiatrists and other health professionals; and there are countless wellness apps that can help individuals make proactive health choices.

3. Consider Alternative Plan Options

Not every plan option will work for every organization. For years, PPOs were the standard, but now high deductible health plans with savings options are having their moment. These plans enable greater heath consumerism and put the decision-making power into employees’ hands. Employers should consider offering mechanisms like HSAs, FSAs and HRAs to help shift costs without compromising health care quality.

4. Require Active Enrollment

Some organizations allow employees to passively enroll in their health benefits. This may seem like a nice timesaver, but it can actually hinder employee health literacy. Instead, employers should require active enrollment among employees. This approach would force employees to review all their benefits options each year before making selections. Not only does this make employees consider important life events, it also affords them an opportunity to reevaluate the benefits they’re paying for and potentially not using. Ultimately, active enrollment can make employees wiser health care consumers, improve proactive health care and lower overall health expenditures.

5. Change the Funding Structure

Another, more drastic, cost-cutting strategy is changing how health plans are funded. Most organizations use a fully insured model, where employers pay a set premium to an insurance provider, but that’s not the only option. For some employers, self-funding, level-funding or reference-based pricing models may be more attractive solutions.

Let us help you review your options to reduce benefits costs

Suffice it to say, there are a variety of ways that employers can structure their health plans—even if that means requiring employees to seek insurance in the individual health market.

Whatever your needs, know that Rinehart, Walters & Danner is here to help. Contact us today to discuss your 2021 benefits and ways to reduce benefits costs.

What You Need To Know Before You Lower Your Auto Insurance Limits

Auto Insurance Limits

Auto Insurance Limits

The cost of living can be pretty expensive. Everyone is looking for ways to cut costs and lower expenses. Auto insurance premiums are one expense many would like to lower. While you may be tempted to lower your auto insurance limits, make sure to weight out all the risks. 

Determining Which Coverage You Need

An auto insurance policy is designed to provide you with a level of protection in the event you are involved in an accident. This includes protection against property, liability and medical costs. Understanding the different parts of coverage is important when selecting your auto insurance limits. 

  • Property coverage pays for damage to or theft of your car.
  • Liability coverage pays for your legal responsibility to others for bodily injury or property damage. 
  • Medical coverage pays for the cost of treating injuries, rehabilitation and sometimes lost wages and funeral expenses. 
  • Underinsured motorists coverage pays for property damage and bodily injury caused by another driver whose coverage is insufficient to cover damages suffered.  

Selecting the correct liability limits is fundamental. On your auto insurance policy you will see your limits listed something like this – 100/300/50. In this example 100/300/50 means you are covered for up to $100,000 in bodily injury coverage per person, $300,000 in bodily injury coverage per accident and $50,000 in property damage per accident.

Many states have minimum liability limit requirements. You may be tempted to reduce your liability limits to the minimum legal level. Or even dropping underinsured motorists coverage. While it may reduce your premium, it could also subject you to substantial risks. 

Collision Coverage – Know The Value Of Your Car

Your policy will not pay for repairs that exceed the value of your vehicle. For this reason, if you are driving a vehicle that isn’t worth more than a few thousand dollars, it may not make sense to purchase collision coverage. Your agent can help you determine if collision insurance makes sense for you. 

Top Ways To Save On Your Auto Premiums

  • Consider raising your deductible.
  • Keep up your good driving record.
  • Drive less to qualify for a low-mileage discount.
  • Drive a car with safety features such as anti-lock brakes and airbags.
  • Install an anti-theft device.
  • Ask about our multi-policy discount. 

We’re here to help. Accidents happen to cautious drivers too. Having adequate auto insurance limits can save you from serious financial burden should you be involved in an accident. We can help you determine which auto insurance coverage is needed and what limits to purchase. 

Important Insurance Tips For Your College Student

Insurance tips for your college student

Insurance tips for your college student

High School is over and it’s time for the next big step, college. The new students schedule is done, books are purchased and the day is approaching fast for the big move. New furniture, décor and electronics are all packed and ready to go. Before your college student can begin their next adventure you have one last item to complete on your check list. Talking with your insurance agent. While that may seem like an odd item to have on your checklist, it is probably one of the most important. Your insurance agent will have important insurance tips for your college student. When your child leaves home and takes up a new residence at college, that can affect how their belongings are covered. Below are a few questions you may have when it comes to insurance and your college student.

Will my college student’s belongings be covered by my homeowners policy?

Does your child lives in a campus dorm? There is usually a small amount of coverage that would be extended from your homeowners policy. If your child has expensive items, or a lot of items, you may need to consider purchasing additional coverage. Does your child lives in off campus housing? Their belongings may not be covered at all.

Is renters insurance really necessary?

Yes. Chances are your child’s belongings will exceed the amount provided by your homeowners policy, if they are even covered at all. Renters insurance will cover the possessions in your child’s housing at a small cost. You can purchase renters insurance for as little as $15 per month. This will not only give you the extra coverage, but peace of mind that that expensive new laptop or TV will be protected in the event of fire, theft, or other disaster.

In addition to your college students belongings, the move to college can affect your auto coverage and health coverage.

Will your child move more than 100 miles away from home?

If this answer is yes and they do not keep a vehicle at school, your insurance premiums could decrease by as much as 30%. If they are taking a car with them, be sure to review your auto coverage with your agent. Make sure you have the appropriate coverage and your child understands how it works in the event of a claim.

Does my child need to purchase health insurance?

In the state of Ohio, many health insurance carriers are now required to coverage children up to age 26. This rule applies regardless of full time student status. Be sure to review your health coverage to verify the dependent age limit on your plan. Also, make sure your child has an ID card with them if they should need to see a Dr or get a Prescription. They should also understand how the coverage works and if there is any copay they will be responsible for if they should have to use the coverage.

Sending a child to college can be a scary yet exciting time for everyone. When you add your insurance agent to your list of people to talk to during this transition, it can help give you peace of mind for you and your child’s future insurance needs. Remember, your agent is a great source for insurance tips for your college student.

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What You Need To Know For Summer Cook Out Safety

Cook Out

Cook OutIt’s getting warmer and you know what that means? It’s time to get out the grills and cook out! As soon as the weather get nice, most families take the cooking duties outdoors. From dinner to family cookouts, fun in the sun includes the gas or charcoal grill. In spite of how great grilled foods taste, gas and charcoal grills account for an average of 10 deaths, 100 injuries and $40 million in property loss each year! (According to the United States Fire Administration). 

We want you to have a great time with your outdoor cook out, but also be safe. Keep reading for some important safety tips. 

Food Safety

  • Don’t cross-contaminate. Keep raw and cooked foods separate by not using the same platters or utensils. 
  • Cook your food thoroughly. Cooking on a grill often results in quicker browning of the meat on the outside, but the inside typically remains raw. Use a food thermometer to ensure your meat is cooked properly. 
    • All raw beef, pork, lamb and veal steaks, chops and roasts should be cooked to a minimum internal temperature of 145 F. 
    • All ground beef, pork, lamb and veal should be cooked to a minimum internal temperature of 160 F. 
    • Poultry should be cooked to a minimum internal temperature of 165 F. 

Avoid Grilling Mishaps

  • Don’t let children and pets play near the grilling area when cooking until the grill is completely cool. 
  • Place your grill at least three feet away from other objects including your home, trees and outdoor seating. 
  • Use starter fluid for barbecue grills that use charcoal only. Do not use starter fluid for gas grills. 
  • Check the connection between the propane tank and the fuel line to make sure it is not leaking and is working properly before using a gas grill. 
  • If you suspect that your gas grill is leaking, turn off the gas and get the unit fixed before lighting. Never use a match to check for leaks.
  • Do not bring your grill into an unventilated or enclosed space such as the garage or inside of your home. This is not only a major fire hazard; it is also a carbon monoxide hazard. 

Cook Out Carefully To Prevent Fires

  • Wear tight-fitting clothing that cannot drape over flames or into pans.
  • If you have long hair, tie it back.
  • Do not place oven mitts, hand towels or hot pads on or near the range.
  • When you are done cooking a meal, double-check to make sure that all appliances are turned off.
  • Unplug portable appliances when they are not in use.
  • When cooking on your range, turn on the vent hood fan to minimize any smoking. 
  • If your gas range does not light on its own, be extremely careful when lighting it.

           If The Event Of A Fire:

  • Turn off the gas or electrical appliance that is fueling the flames, if possible.
  • If the fire is in a pan on your range, cover the pan with its lid or a baking sheet. If this does not work, use a fire extinguisher or sprinkle baking soda on the pan.
  • In the event you are cooking with oil and it catches fire, DO NOT pour water on the flaming pan. This will make the fire worse.

We hope that you take the time to use these simple safety tips to have a great summer cook out season with your friends and family! 

How to Avoid Underinsuring Your Home

Avoid Underinsuring Your Home

Avoid Underinsuring Your Home

Your home is one of your greatest assets and a significant long-term investment. As such, it’s vital to protect your home and its contents with adequate homeowners insurance. Nevertheless, recent research found that many homeowners lack proper coverage. In fact, nearly 2 out of every 3 homes in America are underinsured! That means that the home is protected to an extent by a homeowners policy, but that policy doesn’t have sufficient limits or coverage features to cover the full expense of a potential claim. What’s worse, the average underinsurance amount is over 20%, with some homes being underinsured by as much as 60%.

Don’t let your home become another statistic and suffer the devastating consequences of inadequate coverage in the event of a loss. Review the following guidance to ensure your homeowners insurance policy meets your unique needs and avoid underinsuring your home.

Coverage Elements to Consider When Insuring Your Home

Homeowners insurance offers financial protection in the event of an unexpected disaster or accident involving you, your home or your personal property. However, homeowners insurance policies consist of several different types of coverage. With this in mind, it’s important that you review each form of coverage included on your policy to make sure you are adequately insured for your specific risks. Here are some key coverage elements to look out for:

Dwelling coverage

Dwelling coverage is the portion of your homeowners insurance policy that can offer compensation for the cost of repairing or rebuilding the physical structure of your home if it gets damaged or destroyed by a covered event (e.g., a fire, a windstorm or vandalism). To secure proper dwelling coverage:

  • Make sure you have enough coverage to compensate the full cost of rebuilding your home in the current market. That includes construction expenses (e.g., labor and materials) and the associated costs of making sure your home is compliant with any new or updated building codes within your community. Many homeowners make the mistake of only purchasing enough coverage to compensate the real estate value of their home. That is typically far less than the cost of rebuilding.
  • Don’t forget any important features of your home’s structure when determining the cost of rebuilding. This includes the flooring, countertops and the type of or quality of materials used throughout the structure. Further, avoid making a rough estimate when determining the cost of rebuilding. Be as exact as possible and consider getting assistance from a qualified property valuation expert to ensure a correct calculation and adequate coverage.
  • Be sure to recalculate the cost of rebuilding your home and review your coverage needs whenever you make changes to your home. Examples would be things such as renovating the bathroom, remodeling the kitchen or adding an attached garage.

Other structures coverage
Other structure coverage is the portion of your homeowners insurance policy that can help cover the cost of repairing or rebuilding any detached structures on your property (e.g., a shed or fence) if they get damaged or destroyed by a covered event. Similar to dwelling coverage, it’s crucial to ensure that you have enough other structures coverage to compensate the full cost of rebuilding any of your detached structures. In addition, be sure to reevaluate your coverage needs whenever you make changes to any of your detached structures or add a new detached structure to your property.

Personal property coverage

Personal property coverage is the portion of your homeowners insurance policy that can provide reimbursement for the cost of stolen or damaged items inside your home, such as furniture or electronics. To ensure adequate personal property coverage:

  • Review your policy to ensure you have the best form of coverage for your unique needs. At a glance, there are two forms of personal property coverage—replacement cost and actual cash value. Replacement cost coverage can offer compensation for the cost of replacing your stolen, damaged or destroyed property with a brand-new version (as long as it’s similar in kind and quality) following a covered event. Actual cash value coverage, on the other hand, can offer compensation for the depreciated value of your property. This value is determined by the age, condition and expected remaining useful life of your property prior to the covered event. Be sure to weigh the pros and cons of each form of coverage before making a final selection. Click Here to read more about Replacement cost vs Actual cash value
  • Maintain an up-to-date home inventory checklist. Be sure to include photos of all of your belongings and their original value, as well as an estimate of their current value. This practice will help you better determine just how much coverage you need to fully protect your personal property. However, keep in mind that certain high-value items—such as jewelry, collectible items or fine art—won’t be covered by your homeowners insurance policy and will require specialized coverage.

Loss of use coverage
Loss of use coverage is the portion of your homeowners insurance policy that can help pay for temporary living expenses in the event that you have to move out of your home while it’s being rebuilt or repaired due to a covered event. Loss of use coverage typically equates to up to 20% of the insured value of your home. That being said, make sure you consult your broker if you are concerned that such a value won’t offer enough financial protection for your temporary living arrangements. Also, remember that if you conduct business within your home, this form of coverage will not protect against any loss of income related to your business. You will need to secure specialized coverage for business-related risks.

Liability coverage

Liability coverage is the portion of your homeowners insurance policy that can offer compensation for the expenses that may result if you are found liable for injuring another person or damaging their property. These expenses include medical payments, pain and suffering settlements, lost wages, legal costs and death benefits. Because these expenses can be significant, it’s vital that you have adequate liability coverage tailored to your specific risks. Otherwise, a liability claim could wreak serious havoc on your assets and financial well-being.

Most homeowners insurance policies typically offer a minimum of $100,000 in liability coverage. But, depending on your personal risk profile, you may need to consider securing additional coverage. After all, various property features (e.g., having pets, a trampoline or a pool) can increase your liability risks and require further protection. You may even want to consider purchasing personal umbrella insurance, which can provide additional compensation if your liability coverage is exhausted following a covered claim.

Keep in mind

Lastly, keep in mind that some events—including overland floods and earthquakes—are not always considered covered events on your homeowners insurance policy. If you live in an area that has an elevated risk of these weather-related catastrophes, you will need to obtain additional, specialized coverage. Also, don’t forget that you will usually (with the exception of liability coverage claims) have to pay a deductible before your homeowners insurance kicks in. What’s more, each form of coverage is subject to a limit, which is the maximum amount your policy will pay for a covered claim. Be sure to review your coverage limits to ensure maximum protection. After all, you want to avoid underinsuring your home.

We’re Here to Help

There are a variety of factors to consider in order to avoid underinsuring your home. Rinehart, Walters & Danner is here to walk you through your homeowners policy and help you secure ultimate insurance protection for your personalized risks—ensuring full coverage in the event of a claim. For further insurance guidance, contact us today.

Rinehart Insurance Will Golf For Kids’ Sake This Friday








It’s that time of year again. Summer is coming to an end, but not before we get a few more community events in. This year will mark the 22nd Annual Golf for Kids’ Sake for Mid-Ohio Youth Mentoring. And we are proud to once again be attending this great event. 

The details

When: Friday July 31, 2020

Where: Oak Tree Golf Club

Time: Registration is at 7:30am, Shotgun start at 9:00am.

You can find more details below or by visiting www.midohioyouthmentoring.com

Golf for Kids sake 2020

Join us in supporting this great event and an amazing community program! 








How to Avoid Condominium Coverage Gaps

Condominium Coverage Gaps








Condominium Coverage GapsA new home, less work for you, now it’s time to relax and enjoy all the amenities…well, maybe not yet. If you own a condominium, it’s important to make sure you don’t have any condominium coverage gaps. Owning a condo creates both common and personal insurance needs. Make sure to determine what exactly is covered by your association’s master policy, and what is not.

Condo Association Master Policy

Typically, the condo association carries a master policy. This policy insures all of the property and common areas that are collectively owned by the unit owners. However, it usually does not provide any protection for the interior of your unit or personal possessions. That leaves you with condominium coverage gaps. So what do you do?

Purchasing Your Own Coverage

A Condo Insurance policy is designed to help prevent condominium coverage gaps. A condominium is different than a standard home, therefore it needs a specialized policy. The policy includes coverage for your personal possessions, structural improvements made to your living space and additional living expenses incurred due to an accident.

In addition to the covering your belongings, you will also want to purchase liability protection. This will cover you against lawsuits for bodily injury or property damage that you or a family member cause to other people. In some cases, it even includes coverage for pets. It will pay for the cost of litigation as well as any court awards. Coverage will be provided up to the limit of your policy, and covers you at home or away. 

Other potential Condominium Coverage Gaps

Some additional coverages to consider including: 

  • Unit assessment coverage: This coverage reimburses you for the expense passed on to you by the association as long as the cause of loss was covered by the association’s policy. 
  • Sewer backup: This coverage insures your property for damage by the backup of sewers and drains. It does not include flood protection. 
  • Flood or earthquake: These can strike anywhere, so It’s important to understand your risks and check into coverage options. 

We are here to help. Give us a call if you would like to review your current coverage or if you need to get a brand new policy. 








Adjusting To Your New Normal; Post-Coronavirus

new normal

new normalThere’s no denying that the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic has rapidly and abruptly changed how we live, work and play. As the threat of the coronavirus shifts, Americans are navigating their new normal and figuring out how Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidance for social distancing and mask wearing fits into a daily routine.

You may be experiencing a range of emotions. It’s important to know that it’s completely normal to feel uneasy and confused as you figure out what your post-coronavirus normal looks like. To put things in perspective, to have a fighting chance against the coronavirus, everyone needs to sacrifice and develop a coping mindset. You are not alone in this challenge as millions across the world are weathering the same storm of the coronavirus pandemic.

Consider these coping methods when adjusting to your new normal; post-coronavirus:

  • Focus on what you can control—Focusing on the things you can’t control, like the course of the pandemic and actions of others, will only fuel frustration and stress. Instead, focus on things that you do have control over, such as washing your hands, wearing a mask and practicing social distancing.
  • Adjust expectations—It’s important to approach your new normal with flexible expectations. Just as coronavirus guidance is ever-evolving, your expectations should shift and match reality. Resilient people continually reevaluate and focus on new goals.
  • Be kind—Inside and out of the home, be accepting and polite to others as everyone may be feeling stressed during the pandemic. Collaboration (e.g., problem-solving or sharing), compassion, cheering people on and learning from this overall experience will help you connect with others.
  • Find a routine—As the pandemic seems unpredictable, setting a routine for yourself can help you stay productive and active. Don’t forget to take care of yourself and schedule time for physical and emotional health, social connection and stress relief.
  • Set boundaries—Not everyone is navigating the pandemic the same way and may have different viewpoints on measures like mask wearing and social distancing. Respectfully set your boundaries with family, friends and co-workers. Once again, just focus on what you can control in your life.

Other Considerations

While experiencing stress or anxiety over the health and economic fears brought on by the coronavirus is normal, if you don’t take steps to cope with these feelings, you can put yourself at risk for long-term health effects. Some healthy ways to mitigate your stress and anxiety include exercising, sticking to a routine, spending time outside and meditating.

Since the pandemic is still evolving, get up-to-date information about coronavirus activity and guidance from your local public health authorities, the CDC and the World Health Organization. If you are feeling stressed or anxious navigating your new normal, contact a licensed mental health professional.

How To Promote Safe Teen Driving








With graduation season kicking off, now is the perfect time to remind your children and loved ones about safe teen driving. They have a 3 ton (or heavier) hunk of steel going 55 mph down the road. Make sure they think of their safety, and the safety of those around, them every time they get in the car. Below are a few talking points to go over with them.

Safe Teen Driving Tips

  • Safe teen drivingAlways use your seat belt, even if you’re just going for a short drive down the block – it’s the law!
  • Never drive under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Remember that prescription medications can impact your driving too.
  • Avoid driving at night if you don’t have much experience behind the wheel.
  • Watch the forecast to avoid any inclement weather.
  • Always try to stay at least two seconds behind the vehicle in front of you. This can help give you more reaction time in the event of an emergency. Never use your cellphone in your car.
  • Never talk or text while driving, it can wait.
  • If you ever feel uncomfortable or unsafe on the road, pull over somewhere safe.
  • Obey the speed limit
  • Never reach for something in the car while driving, a lot can happen in the few seconds your eyes are away from the road.

One more thing, many auto insurance companies also offer discount for good grades. It’s as simple as providing your insurance agent with a copy of your kid’s grade card. Stop by our office and review your auto insurance policy with your agent today to make sure you are receiving all available discounts. (Click here for more information about auto insurance)

The best way to ensure child is practicing safe driving is to practice safe driving yourself and to talk to them.

Remember Stop the Texts, Stop the Wrecks!