Do You Understand The Benefits Offered By Your Job?

Benefits Offered By Your Job

Benefits Offered By Your JobMany employers recognize the hard work their employees do every day. In addition to a pay check, many employers will offer additional benefits to compensate their employees. Whether you are a new employee of the company, or an existing employee that has never enrolled in the benefits, understanding everything an employer has to offer can be difficult. We break this all down and help you understand the benefits offered by your job.

Common Benefits Offered By Employers

When it comes to benefits offered by employers, there is no set guideline to use. As a result, employers build their own benefits packages and can pick and choose what they want to offer. Some of the most common options include:

  • Medical Insurance
  • Dental Insurance
  • Vision Insurance
  • Disability Insurance
  • Life Insurance
  • Flexible Spending Account (FSA)
  • Health Savings Account (HSA)

Click here to learn more about employee benefits.

Employer-paid vs Voluntary benefits

Depending on the size of the company you work for, there may be several packages available. Some may be employer-paid, some may be voluntary and some may be in the middle where you and the employer split the cost. There could be several options for benefits offered by your job.

  • Employer-paid benefits are those that the employer pays 100% of the cost. This typically includes life insurance and disability insurance.
  • Voluntary benefits are those you the employee can choose to elect or not. You will pay 100% of the premium. This typically includes dental and vision insurance
  • Contributory benefits are those that you and the employer both pay for. The employer picks how much they will pay and then you pay the remainder. One example would be medical insurance. The employer may pay 80% of the premium, you pay the remaining 20%

What Coverages Are Included In The Benefits Offered By Employers?

This will vary for each company. They will be able to provide you with a summary of benefits that will show you basic plan information. Deductibles, copay’s, coinsurance and maximum out of pocket is standard on each summary. Employers have HR departments or an insurance agent they work with. They will be able to explain everything to you and help you enroll.

Understanding benefits offered by employers can be overwhelming. Take time to review the information provided to you and don’t be afraid to ask questions. Every individual’s situation is different however employers have specific plans in place to help you.

Have questions? Contact us today, we can help.

What Is Rental Car Insurance And Do I Need It?

Rental Car Insurance

Rental Car Insurance

Does your auto insurance cover rental cars?

When renting a car, the rental company will typically ask if you’d like to purchase rental car insurance coverage for the vehicle. It’s at this point when you have to ask yourself: Do my personal insurance policies provide the coverage I need, or should I purchase insurance through the rental car company?

Although standard auto insurance policies may extend to rented vehicles, you should never assume you are protected. Examining your own auto insurance policy will show you the types of coverage you already possess and where additional coverage may be needed. Since auto policies differ, it’s a good rule of thumb to contact your broker so they can help you navigate your policy and determine if you have the appropriate amount of coverage when renting a vehicle.

Examining Your Insurance Policies

When deciding whether or not your personal insurance will cover your rental car, there are a few different coverages you should have. If you answer yes to all of the following questions, you may not need to purchase additional coverage:

  • Do you have liability, collision or comprehensive car insurance? Liability, collision and comprehensive insurance are the three main coverage options available when purchasing car insurance. Although it is not always required to purchase all three coverages, they can optimize your protection in the event of an accident.
    • Liability insurance provides coverage if you damage or injure another person or their personal property.
    • Collision insurance provides coverage if your vehicle is involved in a collision, either with another vehicle or object.
    • Comprehensive insurance provides coverage if your car is damaged by a variety of exposures such as theft, vandalism or natural disasters.
  • Does your policy cover administrative fees, loss of use or towing charges? It’s always a good idea to check see whether your insurance company pays for—or provides a rider for—additional fees associated with rental cars. This coverage can be helpful if a car you rent is lost, stolen or damaged.
  • Do you have a renters or homeowners policy that will cover your belongings if lost or damaged? Your homeowners or renters insurance policy covers your personal belongings from theft, fire or vandalism within your home. Policies often include off-premises coverage that can extend your coverage to outside your residence. Therefore, if personal belongings in your vehicle are stolen or damaged, your homeowners or renters insurance policy may be able to cover a percentage of your losses. Not all insurance carriers will extend coverage to protect personal belongings within your vehicle—always check with your broker to see what your renters or homeowners policy covers.

What Is Rental Car Insurance, and What Does It Cover?

Car rental companies provide additional coverage that is often used to supplement insurance you already possess.

Rental car agencies offer four different coverage options:

  1. Supplemental liability insurance: Most car rental companies need to have the minimum amount of liability coverage required by the state, but oftentimes it isn’t an adequate amount of coverage. If you have a personal car insurance policy with a high liability limit, you may not need additional protection.
  2. Loss damage waiver (LDW)/collision damage waiver (CDW): This is not insurance per se, but rather a document that can alleviate your financial responsibility should your rental vehicle be damaged or stolen. This also includes loss of use coverage if the rental company charges you for the amount of time the car could not be used while being repaired, as well as other administrative fees the car rental agency assesses. The LDW may become void if the incident occurred from the driver of the rented vehicle exhibiting reckless behavior, speeding or the vehicle being driven on unpaved roads.
  3. Personal accident insurance: This will cover the driver and any passengers within the rented vehicle for any medical bills caused by a car crash. This coverage is useful if you do not already have health insurance or personal injury protection insurance.
  4. Personal effects coverage: This covers any personal belongings that are stolen from the rental vehicle. If you already have renters or homeowners insurance, this may already be covered under your policy.

The coverages offered are oftentimes the same as what you already have for your personal car insurance. Again, to avoid paying for coverage you already have, review your policy before renting a vehicle.

Does Your Credit Card Provide Rental Insurance?

Many reputable credit card companies offer rental insurance to their customers. To utilize this secondary form of coverage, you must put the total amount of the car rental on your credit card. In many cases, credit card companies will also require you to deny any insurance offered by the car rental agency in order to access their coverage. In the event that your rental car is in a covered incident, the credit card company will help cover costs of damage or theft up to a certain dollar amount. Various rental car fees can be covered by your credit card, but this can vary by provider.

Before purchasing any additional coverage through the car rental facility, call your credit card company to see if your card offers car rental insurance. Since most credit card rental insurance is classified as a secondary form of coverage, you may need to rely on your personal auto insurance coverage first.

Ask About Your Policy

Deciding on your rental car coverage can be a tricky endeavor. Before purchasing any extra coverage, talk to your insurance broker about your personal auto insurance policy and whether you may need to purchase any additional insurance. No one wants to pay more for their auto insurance, and you shouldn’t have too.

If you have any questions or are unsure if rental vehicles are covered under your policy, contact Rinehart, Walters & Danner today.

Click here for Auto Insurance information.

What Is Umbrella Insurance? Do I Need It?

Umbrella Insurance








Umbrella InsuranceAfter a long day at the office, Sally is finally on her way home. Deciding she is not going to go home and cook dinner, she reaches for her cell phone to call in a takeout order. She takes a moment to look at her phone to find the number, just a few seconds, but that was all it took to miss that the car in front of her had turned on its turn signal and slowed down. Sally rear ends the car in front of her. This accident resulted in serious injuries, which turned into a lawsuit and court dates.

Sally was found at fault and ordered to pay $1,000,000 for medical expenses, lost wages and the “pain and suffering” of the injured parties. Although she had auto insurance, the policy had a limit of $300,000. That leaves Sally to make up the additional $700,000. Fortunately Sally didn’t have to drain her assets because she has personal umbrella insurance.

What is umbrella insurance?

It is a policy that will extend the limits of your auto and homeowners insurance policies. It will also provide coverage for personal injury claims. Like an umbrella that protects you from the rain, a personal umbrella insurance policy provides an extra layer of insurance coverage over your standard liability policies. It protects your personal assets by kicking in when your standard liability coverage is exhausted. Even if your assets are small, it can protect your income; in some settlements, wages can be garnished up to 10 years.  In Short: an umbrella insurance policy protects you from a downpour – that worse-case scenario where you could lose everything in a lawsuit.

Learn more about personal insurance – Click here

Who needs a umbrella insurance?

You do! contrary to popular believe, umbrella insurance is not just for the wealthy. We recommend that everyone consider carrying an umbrella insurance policy. If you have a teenage driver, own a swimming pool or entertain at your home frequently, you could have increased chances of getting sued. It is wise to supplement your insurance with umbrella insurance.

How much do I need?

That is something you should discuss with your agent to ensure you have enough coverage. You’ll want to take into consideration not only your total personal assets but your potential personal risks. Coverage starts at $1 million, and can go as high as $10 million.

How much does coverage cost?

Compared to the coverage you gain, additional liability insurance is fairly inexpensive. Depending on the policy value and your personal risk factors, such as recent auto tickets, your credit rating and more, a $1 million umbrella insurance policy typically costs about a dollar per day. Cost goes up an additional $50 to $75 for each million thereafter.

Don’t put your savings and assets at risk. Count on our expertise and let us design an insurance plan to fit your needs.

Click here to contact us to get started today.








Do I Have To Pay If A Tree Falls On My House?

tree falls








tree fallsEvery year, storms are responsible for knocking over or breaking off limbs of numerous trees. Unfortunately, sometimes, a limb or tree falls on our house or other property. Cleaning up the damage from a storm can be a difficult task, both physically and emotionally. And things can become especially tense when you discover that it’s your neighbor’s tree that damaged your house.

To make matters worse, many homeowners are surprised to discover that if a neighbor’s tree falls on their house, it’s usually their own homeowners policy—not their neighbor’s—that will cover the cost of the damages. What follows are general guidelines for who pays what in various situations. However, you should also check your homeowners policy for coverages and exclusions. (Click here to learn more about homeowners insurance policies)

Your Property, Your Policy

Generally speaking, if your property is damaged, you are responsible for the damages. It doesn’t matter if the tree or limb came from your property, your neighbor’s property or even municipal property. Keep in mind that a windstorm isn’t anyone’s fault; it’s an act of nature. If a tree does damage your property during a windstorm, your policy will cover the damages. After all, that’s why you purchased a homeowners policy. To protect yourself against unforeseen losses like a tree damaging your house.

Their Property, Their Policy

It might seem unfair that if it’s your neighbor’s tree that damages your home, you should have to pay. Fortunately for you, that standard applies both ways. If a storm rolls through and your tree falls and damages your neighbor’s house, his or her insurance is going to cover the damages.

Negligence and Liability

So far, these scenarios have been fairly straightforward. But what happens when it wasn’t a storm that made the tree fall? Instead, your neighbor’s tree was hollowed out from years of disease, and he’d neglected to do anything about it. In fact, it was so diseased that you expressed your concern to your neighbor that it might topple over and damage your property. Unfortunately, one day, that’s exactly what happens. What then?

Your insurance carrier is still going to be the one paying your claim. However, if you can prove your neighbor knew that the tree was diseased and that he or she neglected to fix it your insurance carrier would probably attempt to collect from your neighbor’s insurance. If your carrier is successful, you could be reimbursed for your deductible.

Remember, though, this rule also applies the other way. If you have diseased or damaged trees on your property and they damage your neighbor’s house, he or she can try to prove your negligence. Your property is your responsibility. So it’s best to inspect your trees every year for signs of disease or damage. If you’re not sure what you’re looking for, consider having a professional arborist examine your trees.

Other Structures

If the tree doesn’t damage your house but instead damages your fence, are you still covered? Generally, you are. Most homeowners policies distinguish between two different kinds of structures on your property. The “dwelling” refers to your house and any attached structures (like an attached garage), as well as any fixtures attached to the house. “Other structures,” including detached garages, sheds, fences or gazebos, are also insured, but typically only for 10 percent of the coverage on your dwelling.

Vehicles

If, in the aftermath of a storm, you discover that a tree has fallen on your car, your homeowners policy doesn’t apply. Instead, you’ll be looking at your auto policy. If you have comprehensive coverage on your vehicle, your auto insurance carrier will pay for the damages, after you pay your deductible. The same rule would apply to a guest’s car. Hopefully, he or she took out comprehensive coverage, too.(Click here to learn about auto insurance)

Removal and Cleanup

What if the tree fell but didn’t hit anything? Would you be covered for removal costs? If the fallen tree blocks a path to your front door or driveway, then many homeowners policies would pay for removal. Generally, the maximum coverage is around $500. If the tree simply falls in the middle of your yard, your policy likely wouldn’t cover it. Unless the fallen tree damaged insured property, there is no loss to file a claim for.

Replacement

Replacing the trees themselves can be more complicated. Trees that have fallen due to wind damage may or may not be covered, so it’s best to check with your broker. Most policies offer limited coverage for trees that have fallen due to fire, lightning, explosion, theft, vandalism, malicious mischief or aircraft. Amounts and exclusions will vary. It’s important to read your policy and check with your broker if you have any questions.

Making Sure You’re Covered

Hopefully, your trees grow and endure. In the event that they fall, it’s important to know that you’re covered. Contact our office today to make sure that you have sufficient coverage for whatever might blow your way.








Halloween Doesn’t Need To Scare Your Bank Account

Halloween








Halloween

What do you get when you mix costumes, decorations, and candy? A Happy Halloween!!
Those that have children, probably feel the sting a little more while at the check-out. But Halloween doesn’t need to break the bank.

A few tips to keep in mind to help you save money

• Buy bulk candy to get the most for your money.
• Ration out how much you will give each Trick-or-Treater.
• Buy pumpkins close to Halloween to get the best deal.
• Make your own decorations – use leaves for stuffing in outside decorations, spray paint cardboard or cereal boxes for DIY headstones, or use cotton balls as cobwebs.
• Make your own costumes or only buy what you have to.

Halloween Safety Tips

In addition to saving money, your family’s safety is extremely important. Costumes, trick-or-treating and pumpkin carving are all Halloween traditions. But there are also dangers associated with each of those activities.

Costume Precautions

• Do not let children wear baggy or long costumes, as they are difficult to walk in and can be tripping hazards.
• Purchase wigs, costumes and accessories that are fire-retardant.
• Select face makeup and paint that is labeled as “FDA Approved” or “Non-toxic” to prevent allergic reactions.
• Place reflective tape on your children’s costumes and candy buckets if they are going trick-or-treating at night.

Trick-or-Treat Safety

• Remind children to walk only on the sidewalk and look both ways before crossing the street.
• Do not allow children under 12 years old to go trick-or-treating by themselves.
• Remind children to never approach or get into a car with a stranger offering them candy.
• Once your children get home, inspect their candy.

Pumpkin Carving Tips

• Only carve pumpkins on a flat surface with good lighting, such as a kitchen table.
• Use a pumpkin-carving kit that includes tools appropriate for the task.
• Place lit jack-o’-lanterns away from flammable objects such as sheets and curtains.
Having a good time does not mean spending a lot of money. Even on a budget you can have a spooky Happy Halloween!








The Mid-Ohio Youth Mentoring Comedy Benefit Show Is This Saturday!

Mid-Ohio Youth Mentoring








Mid-Ohio Youth MentoringMid-Ohio Youth Mentoring, formerly known as Big Brothers Big Sisters of North Central Ohio, is a well known local program. They have mentored children, ages 5 through 16, in communities across Mid-Ohio for the last 25 years.

Visiting their website you can see their mission

“Our mission is to provide youth in our community with a mentor that supports, encourages, and provides opportunities, that will help them achieve success in life.” 

In order to make their mission successful, they need donations.

One popular event they hold annually is the Mid-Ohio Youth Mentoring Comedy Benefit Show. This year’s show is Saturday October 12th at 7pm. To get your see more details and purchase your tickets, visit their website. 

https://www.midohioyouthmentoring.com/calendar/2019/10/12/comedy-benefit-show-a-night-of-improv

Help us support them by spreading the word. 

Mid-Ohio Youth Mentoring Comedy Show








How To Stay Healthy And Avoid The Flu This Fall

avoid the flu








avoid the fluIt’s that time of year again. The leaves are changing, the temperature is getting cooler, and you’re doing everything you can to avoid the flu. No one enjoys being sick, but some of us are more prone to sickness than others. Knowing where you are most likely to come into contact with germs and what you can do to prevent sickness are key for this fall season. 

Germ Hot Spots

There are several “hot spots” to keep in mind when it comes to germs. 

  • Doorknobs
  • Light Switches
  • Elevator buttons
  • Water fountain handles
  • Microwave door handles
  • Telephones
  • Bathroom faucets
  • Handrails

These areas are high traffic areas that can be touched by numerous people. When you touch a doorknob you never know if the person who touched it before you sneezed into their hand and didn’t was it. Yuck! 

What You Can Do to Help Yourself Avoid The Flu

  • Wash your hands. Even if you are cautious of what you touch, there is a chance you’ve still come into contact with some germ. To protect yourself from illness, it’s important to wash your hands regularly, especially before you eat or after you cough, sneeze or use the restroom. 
  • Keep your distance. Illnesses can spread fast. Keep your distance from others who are sick. 
  • Get the flu shot. Yearly flu shots are the single best way to prevent getting sick. Contrary to popular belief, flu vaccines cannot cause the flu, though side effects may occur. Often, these side effects are minor and may include congestion, coughs, headaches, abdominal pain and wheezing. 
    • Did you know many health insurance plans cover the flu shot at 100% or a small copay? If you need help determining your health insurance benefits, we can help. Give us a call or click here or here to learn more about health insurance benefits.

Taking the extra time to wash hands and wipe down surfaces could mean the difference between a happy fall and an unpleasant fall spent on the couch sick. Stay healthy and do your part to spread the word to others. 








Answers To The 7 Most Frequently Asked Benefit Questions

Frequently Asked Benefit Questions

Frequently Asked Benefit QuestionsWhen it comes to benefits, such a health insurance, many can agree that it is confusing. Unless you are involved in health insurance or Human Resources it can be hard to make sense of everything. We have compiled a list of some of the 7 most frequently asked benefit questions and their answers to hopefully make things a little easier to understand. 

What is a Deductible?

A deductible is the amount of money you or your dependents must pay toward a health claim before your organization’s health plan makes any payments for health care services rendered. For example, a plan participant with a $100 deductible would be required to pay the first $100, in total, of any claims during a plan year.

What is Coinsurance?

On top of your deductible, coinsurance is a provision in your health plan that shows what percentage of a medical bill you pay and the percentage a health plan pays.

What is an Out-of-pocket Maximum (OOPM)?

An OOPM is the maximum amount (deductible and coinsurance) that you will have to pay for covered expenses under a plan. Once the OOPM is reached the plan will cover eligible expenses at 100 percent.

What is an Explanation of Benefits (EOB)?

An EOB is a description your insurance carrier sends to you. It explains the health care benefits that you received and the services for which your health care provider has requested payment.

What is a Preferred Provider Organization (PPO)?

A PPO is a group of hospitals and physicians that contract on a fee-for-service basis with insurance companies to provide comprehensive medical service. If you have a PPO, your out-of-pocket costs may be lower than in a non-PPO plan.

What is Utilization Management (UM)?

Utilization Management is the process of reviewing the appropriateness and the quality of care provided to patients. UM may occur before (pre-certification), during (concurrent) or after (retrospective) medical services are rendered. 

For example, your health plan may require you to seek prior authorization from your UM company before admitting you to a hospital for nonemergency care. This would be an example of pre-certification. Your medical care provider and a medical professional at the UM company will discuss what is the best course of treatment for you before care is delivered. UM can reduce unnecessary hospitalizations, treatment and costs.

What is a High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP)?

An HDHP is a type of insurance plan that offers a low premium offset by a high deductible. Because of the low cost of the plan, the insurer will not cover most medical expenses until the deductible is met. As an exception, preventive care services are typically covered before the deductible is met. HDHPs are often designed to be compatible with heath savings accounts (HSAs). HSAs are tax-advantaged accounts that can be used to pay for qualified out-of-pocket medical expenses before the HDHP’s deductible is met.

We hope you found this list of 7 most frequently asked benefit questions and their answers helpful. If you did, please take a moment to share this post. 

Would you like to know more about health insurance? Click here for Individual or Click here for Employee Benefits. 

Join Us For An eWaste Recycling Day September 28, 2019

eWaste Recycling Day








Everyone can probably agree that they have a pile of old electronic devices or equipment just laying around taking up space. Personal or Business alike. Most of these items you can not simply just throw in the trash, and it usually costs money to dispose of them. Because of this inconvenience, we have decided to partner with Richland Newhope Industries and Celina Insurance to hold an eWaste Recycling Day. And it will conveniently be held right at our office! 

Join us September 28, 2019 for an eWaste Recycling Day

This event will run from 8:30 am – 11:30 am or until capacity is reached. Below is a flyer that shows the accepted and not accepted materials. You can also find information on the Facebook Event Page

 

eWaste Recycling Day

Help us spread the word about the eWaste Recycling Day event!

 








3 Ways Your Cell Phone Is Harming Your Sleep

harming your sleep








harming your sleepThe personal electronic devices that help make your daily life easier may be doing the opposite in regard to your nightly sleep habits. If you’re having a hard time falling and staying asleep, your cellphone, TV and tablet may be to blame. Keep reading so see how these devices are actually harming your sleep. 

The Negative Effects

Researchers at Harvard identified three main ways that using your phone, or any electronic device, before going to bed can derail your sleep schedule:

  1. Melatonin suppression. The Harvard study revealed that those who used electronic devices before going to sleep had lower levels of the sleep-regulating hormone, melatonin. That’s because the blue light emitted by electronic devices suppresses the production of melatonin. Melatonin controls your circadian rhythm—your body’s natural sleep and wake clock.
  2. Later sleep onset. The study also found that the amount of time it took to fall asleep was longer for those who used electronic devices than for those who didn’t. If you’re mindlessly scrolling through social media sites instead of reading a book or meditating, it’s more likely that you’ll have a harder time falling asleep.
  3. Reduced REM sleep. Research shows that electronic device usage before bed results in a reduced amount of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep cycles. REM sleep is a vital component of our sleep patterns.

What Can You Do?

To prevent the harmful effects of electronic devices, there are a few steps that you can take, including:

  • Check your device’s settings for a “nighttime” mode, which adjusts the screen lighting to promote sleep.
  • Refrain from using your phone for at least an hour before bed.
  • Set your device’s sound settings to “silent”. This way you won’t be woken by texts or emails while you’re trying to sleep.
  • Try reading a book or meditating to relax before bed instead of using your phone or watching TV.

For more information on sleep-promoting activities, contact your doctor today.